Monthly Archives: November 2012

There’s nothing else quite like Black college football

I’ve attended my share of Gopher football games over the years, but those games are mostly anti-climatic and the home school band painfully plays the same tired old songs. I have yet to see in person a Black college football game, but a good friend of mine tells me once you go Black (college football), you don’t go back. “Unlike major college football, Black college football is the African American pastime,” states Mark Gray, who broadcasts HBCU games for the Heritage Sports Radio Network.  It “is part cultural, part show. It touches a place in your soul that you didn’t know was there until it gets there.”

Black college bands and their halftime shows are as much an integral part of Black college football as the teams. “I know a lot of people want to see those bands as part of the overall [Black college] experience,” says Gray. “At major college games, people leave [their seats] at halftime to get their refreshments. Continue Reading →

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Bears smack Vikings to regain first place

CHICAGO — On a spectacular sun-splashed Sunday in my hometown of Chicago at historic Soldier Field, the Vikings had their bubble of expectation busted by the monsters of the Midway, the Chicago Bears — Bears 28, Vikings 10. It was more like a mauling. Clearly, for whatever reason, the Vikings were not ready Sunday. Jay Cutler returned to the starting lineup at quarterback for the Bears after battling concussion symptoms, and maybe that was enough to inspire the Bears, who had lost back-to-back prime time contests to 10-1 Houston (13-6, the game in which Cutler suffered a concussion) and to 8-2-1 San Francisco, who beat the Bears up 32-7 on Monday Night Football. The Vikings were just what the Bears needed, a team half-stepping along but not totally committed to getting the job done. Continue Reading →

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Walter Bond credits Clem Haskins with making men of boys

 

Before he became a big-time motivational speaker, Walter Bond played big-time hoops at Minnesota (1988-91) and played three NBA seasons. After an appearance last week at the North Community YMCA as the featured speaker at its business speaker series (Bond’s remarks are featured on the Metro page of this week’s edition), he told the MSR, “Clem Haskins was a phenomenal leader — he was the one who told me to be a motivational speaker. The one thing that I respect and love him for is [that] at age 18 he had an amazing impact on me not only as an athlete but also as a person. He turned me from a little boy to a man. He could do things that probably my dad couldn’t do because he had a different role.”

After he retired from basketball, Bond said he tried entering the business world but was routinely turned away. Continue Reading →

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Up-and-coming hoopster girls to watch

The girls’ basketball season has begun with eight of the state’s top players already signed with Division I schools. If you ever get a chance to get to a game, check these players out. (The college each signed with is in parentheses). NIA COFFEY (Northwestern): While averaging 15.7 points per game, the 5-9 guard led Hopkins to the Class 4A state championship. ALLINA STARR (Auburn): The 5-10 guard averaged 16 point while helping DeLaSalle capture their second straight Class 3A crown. Continue Reading →

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Up-and-coming hoopster girls to watch

The girls’ basketball season has begun with eight of the state’s top players already signed with Division I schools. If you ever get a chance to get to a game, check these players out. (The college each signed with is in parentheses). NIA COFFEY (Northwestern): While averaging 15.7 points per game, the 5-9 guard led Hopkins to the Class 4A state championship. ALLINA STARR (Auburn): The 5-10 guard averaged 16 point while helping DeLaSalle capture their second straight Class 3A crown. Continue Reading →

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Motivational speaker transfers NBA skills to the business world

Walter Bond teaches audiences the importance of connecting

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

After leaving the NBA, Walter Bond was told he didn’t have enough experience during his job searches. “We’re looking for someone with more experience,” he vividly recalls being told by interviewers who didn’t think playing against and with the world’s best athletes in both college and the pros qualified him for the business world. “You won’t find [any]one more experienced than me,” he told the interviewers. Looking back, Bond said that not getting hired was the best thing that could have happened to him. He has been a motivational speaker for over a decade, appearing before nearly 75 major corporations around the country and teaching his audiences around the world basic principles for success through speeches, workshops, and through his books and CDs. Continue Reading →

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The growing contingent workforce: Contract work can present new opportunities

With 35 percent of U.S. companies relying on smaller staffs since the recession, the landscape of the labor market is changing substantially and more employers are beginning to emphasize the contingent, flexible workforce. A recent survey from CareerBuilder finds that this trend is fully expected to continue through 2012, as 36 percent of responding companies said they planned to hire temporary or contract workers this year. This number is up from 34 percent last year, 30 percent for 2010 and 28 percent for 2009. In addition to demonstrating the idea that the flexible workforce is beginning to take hold, the results of the survey are also positive for the individual workers themselves as 35 percent of these employers said they ultimately planned to hire their temporary employees on a permanent basis. Why has there been such expanded use of contingent workers by U.S. business? Continue Reading →

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The healing effect of cooking is in the hand of the preparer

Salut a los espíritus of this house and the espiritu que abre las puertas,” (greetings to the spirits of this house and the spirit that opens doors), I said as I entered the small one-bedroom apartment of my spiritual godfather from Cuba. Kneeling down to greet Elegua, the gatekeeper of the crossroads in Cuban Santeria, whom by custom sits behind the front door, I saluted the ancestral spirits that dwell in, guard and protect my godfather’s home. Sitting down on the sofa, while remaining still, and very conscious of my body language, I listened while my godfather began to conduct the ritual of welcoming me into the space. “Mafarefun,” he said to each of his personal ancestors and the ancestors of the Yoruban tradition. “Mitchelle aa-quita,” (Michelle is here) he said. Continue Reading →

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November is National Pet Diabetes Awareness Month

November is National Pet Diabetes Month, and BluePearl Veterinary Partners encourages pet owners to become more aware of the signs and symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes is a relatively common disease in which the body doesn’t use glucose properly. If left untreated, diabetes is life-threatening. It is manageable and if detected early enough, pets with diabetes can live a normal life when treated and medicated properly. In some cases with cats, diabetes can actually be reversed. Continue Reading →

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Black student-athletes grad rates ‘nothing to applaud’ — ‘Corporate business’ culture produces profits, exploits students

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

 

University of Minnesota Black male student-athletes are graduating at 50 percent or better for the first time in five years, though a significant graduation gap still exists between them and their White counterparts. For Black women, however, the gap widens. The NCAA 2012 Graduation Success Rate (GSR) report in October noted that all U-M student athletes who entered either as first-time freshmen, entered at mid-year or transferred into the school from 2002-2005 are graduating at 83 percent. Yet, Minnesota’s Black male graduation rate is 55 percent, and 67 percent for Black females, while White males and females graduate at 79 percent and 95 percent respectively. The NCAA created the annual GSR report released each fall in 2005 to more accurately reflect actual graduation rates. Continue Reading →

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