Monthly Archives: March 2013

Eliminating health disparities is Liberian native’s passion

 

By Michelle Lawrence

Contributing Writer

 

People of African heritage in Minnesota experience higher rates of chronic disease, morbidity and mortality compared to nearly every other cultural group in the state, according to fact sheets compiled by the Minnesota Department of Health. Yet, despite these dismal facts, which would discourage some and certainly overwhelm others, there are women champions in our community. One such champion is Dr. Wilhelmina Holder, executive director of W.I.S.E (Women’s Initiative for Self-Empowerment), who work diligently every day to improve the health status of Minnesota residents of African heritage, and to reduce disparities among them and other cultural groups in the state, particularly residents of European American descent. Growing up in her native country of Liberia in West Africa, Dr. Holder learned from concrete experience that access to health care can improve health statistics and save lives. “I am driven by the teachings of Jesus Christ,” she says when asked of her personal and professional motives. Continue Reading →

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Doctor’s Advice for Your Good Health

Dr. Crutchfield, my daughter has acne. Won’t she just outgrow it, or should we treat it?  

Why should anyone care about treating acne? 

Acne is a very common skin condition that affects over 90 percent of people in their lives. At a time when adolescents are developing a strong sense of self, self-worth, value and identity, acne not only contributes to low self-esteem, but can also cause long-term and permanent scars on the skin. If it bothers the patient, it should be treated. Continue Reading →

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Game of Change: Racial integration of basketball didn’t end discrimination

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Last Friday marked the 50th anniversary of the Loyola (Chicago)-Mississippi State NCAA regional semi-finals game played at Jenison Field House in East Lansing, Mich. on March 15, 1963. This week, “Sports Odds and Ends” features an “Another View” column originally published in the MSR April 30, 2009 edition on the contest called the “Game of Change.”  

 

Many believe that the 1966 Texas Western men’s basketball team with five Black starters, who defeated an all-White Kentucky squad for that year’s national title, cemented integration in college sports. But actually, a game played three years earlier poured the final mixture, so to speak. An all-White Mississippi State team played Loyola, with four Black starters, in the1963 NCAA Mideast Regional in East Lansing, Michigan. Continue Reading →

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Blacks are four times more likely to develop kidney disease

Early detection essential to controlling the condition
 

By Robin James

Contributing Writer

Eliminating health disparities is hard work, particularly when it comes to tackling the list of disparities directly related to the African American population. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is linked to that list of health challenges. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has designated March as National Kidney Month to raise awareness about the prevention and early detection of kidney disease, which can lead to kidney failure. The risk of kidney disease is linked directly to higher rates of diabetes and high blood pressure, two of the leading causes of kidney disease. This increase is thought to be closely linked to rising rates of obesity. Continue Reading →

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Why Egypt?

“For us the return to Egypt in every domain is the necessary condition to reconcile African civilization with history, to build a body of modern human sciences and to be able to renew African culture…Egypt will play the same role in the rethinking and renewing of African culture that ancient Greece and Rome play in the culture of the West (including North America)”

— Cheikh Anta Diop

 

“Black Americans” occupy a unique position as a people in this country and, by extension, North America. I say unique because we are the only people who have gone through a deliberate process of erasure, an erasure that has stripped from our conscious awareness a collective sense of cultural continuity beyond our immediate experience in North America. The erasure has had a profound effect on the psyche of our people and continues to have a negative effect in many diverse ways. As a people, we experience great difficulty in coming together or coming to a consensus in order to act in the best interest of our collective selves. I believe that the collective paralysis we are witnessing today is tied to the perpetual process of erasure. Continue Reading →

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Black in the USA

 
Sixteen year old Brooklyn youth shot and killed , protests held
Kimani Gray was shot and killed last week in Brooklyn, after being hit by 7 bullets fired by two plain clothes New York City police detectives. Autopsies so far revealed that 3 bullets entered the teen from the rear. According to police the teen pointed a pistol at two plainclothes officers. Commissioner Ray Kelly said the department has three “ear witnesses” who heard officers tell Gray to “freeze” and “don’t move” before firing 11 shots. However another eyewitness Tishana King interviewed in the New York Daily News who said she saw what happened from her window reported that she is “certain [Gray] didn’t have anything in his hands” when he was shot. Continue Reading →

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Oprah and Terrance are heating up the internet!

 

 

The web has been buzzing and howling about the back and forth between Terrence Howard and Oprah Winfrey who star in the upcoming movie  The Butler. Howard had said rather coyly in an interview with Movie Fanatic about Oprah that she had some “tig ole bitties” and that she’s “such a lovely and voluptuous woman.” Oprah was a sport about it. In an interview with Steve Harvey she said she wasn’t offended, saying “I do have big breastesses.”  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Georgia Ellyse: Why you need to know about Mike De’cole

 
At a time when R&B has been said to be on the decline or even dying, Mike De’cole surfaces as a pleasant pulse and breath of fresh air. The Chicago native, recently dropped his debut single “Never (Lost Without You)” and has received great reviews from Twin Cities critics. He is constantly doing shows in the metro area and has performed in sets with artists like Ray Covington and Chantel Sings. But what makes him stand out at a time when the music industry is saturated with youtube wannabes and autotune singers? Mike De’cole took a few minutes to chat with Miss Georgia about his inspirations and what sets him apart as an artist. Continue Reading →

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Council on Black Minnesotans has new director, new agenda, new vision to get beyond tolerance

 

 

 

 

 

By Vickie Evans-Nash

Editor-in-Chief

 

In October 2012, Edward McDonald was appointed director of the Council on Black Minnesotans (COBM). The process began when he was approached by friends and colleagues who thought he would serve well in the role. Raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and completing his undergrad studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth in 1980, he received a post-graduate degree as a legal assistant and completed his graduate studies at Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government. He returned to the Twin Cities in the early ’90s, working as public policy manager for Family and Children’s Service. Now married for 32 years with two adult children, he has lived in Oakdale, Minnesota since 1994 but says he is not disconnected from areas with a larger population of people of African descent. Continue Reading →

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Minnesota legislators work to finalize State health exchange — Democratic majority doesn’t make exchange a ‘slam dunk’

 

 

By Charles Hallman 

Staff Writer

 

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates that beginning in 2014, each state either must have a health exchange available that allows qualified individuals to buy coverage, or join with other states to create regional exchanges. Or can let the federal government do it. It is intended not only to offer affordable health insurance to consumers, but also to increase competition among private insurers, giving their prospective consumers the ability to choose from at least four different levels of policies. Minnesota’s new health insurance exchange is now a couple of steps from becoming reality after the Minnesota House last week voted 72 to 58 on a health insurance exchange bill. Minnesota is among 17 states plus the District of Columbia that are setting state-based exchanges. Continue Reading →

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