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African Americans underrepresented in STEM classes

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Many young African Americans will be shut out of the high paying jobs of the future, if they don’t earn a degree in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), according to a new report.

The new report by The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, a coalition of more than 200 advocacy and outreach groups, said that less than 3 percent of Blacks… Continue Reading →

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Book highlights Black cowboy poetry

 

It never ceases to amaze how little need there’d be for Black History had American History been accurately told to begin with. But, just like every else outside slavery, positive aspects of historic Black life consistently are obscured. Including the truth about the legendary Old Wild West. The daring exploits of desperadoes like Jesse James, Wild Bill Hickock and the rest of them get romanticized to the point of hero worship, thanks mainly to Hollywood’s shoot ’em up cowboy movies. But independent films like Richard C. Kahn’s The Bronze Buckaroo are lost and we have Django Unchained simply because a White director made it. Continue Reading →

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June is Men’s Health Month

In 1994, Congress declared June as Men’s Health Month to recognize men’s health as a family issue and highlight its impact on wives, mothers, daughters and sisters. Men’s Health Month also heightens awareness of preventable health problems and encourages early detection and treatment of disease among males. One of the keys to good health is preventive care with routine screenings for diseases such as: Diabetes; Cholesterol; High Blood pressure; Prostrate Cancer and Heart Disease. Heart disease is the number-one cause of death for both men and women. Below is a list of risk factors for heart disease:

• Age 45 or older? Continue Reading →

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Ruby Dee passes

October 27, 1922 — June 11, 2014
 

Cultural icon and beloved actor Ruby Dee is no longer among us. She was best known for her film portrayal in 1961 of the achingly vulnerable, nonetheless strong-willed Ruth of Lorraine Hansberry’s classic A Raisin in the Sun, sharing the screen with Sidney Poitier, Claudia McNeil and Dianna Sands, a role she’d originated on Broadway two year earlier. From 1946 to 2013, she appeared in upwards of 150 screen and television roles, including star turns in American Gangster with Denzel Washington, Stephen King’s The Stand, Spike Lee’s Do The Right Thing, Jungle Fever with Wesley Snipes, her husband Ossie Davis and Samuel L. Jackson, along with then up-and-coming Halle Berry, Cat People with Nastassja Kinski, The Jackie Robinson Story and The Court Martial of Jackie Robinson. A devoted activist, she combined with her acting career a passion for progress in the fight for civil rights, also appearing on the 1960s drama Police Woman (NBC) as a character clearly based on Angela Davis. During the ‘60s she helped African American actors and directors break into the business by lending her profile to such politically charged projects as Gone Are the Days and The Incident. Continue Reading →

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This weekend, it’s jazz-related concerts galore!

Brooklyn-based ensemble Red Baraat makes its debut at Orchestra Hall on Friday, April 25 at 8 pm. Critics have described their performance as “a shot of pure adrenalin.” Established in 2008, Red Baraat is an eight-piece band from Brooklyn, New York. The brainchild of Sunny Jain, the group has been celebrated worldwide for its live performances of original sound — a blending of North Indian bhangra rhythms, New Orleans brass band, jazz, go-go, brass funk, and hip hop. Sunny Jain is known as a rising star in the jazz world. Continue Reading →

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In memory of three great men

By Charles Hallman
Staff writer

 

We lost three individuals this April; I personally didn’t know each of them, but came close to meeting one of them. Charles Sumner “Chuck” Stone, Jr. died April 6 of congestive heart failure at an assisted-living facility in North Carolina at the age of 89. Born in 1924 in St. Louis, he was a Tuskegee Airman in World War II. Then, instead of attending Harvard — who accepted him, he instead went to and graduated from Wesleyan University in 1948, and later earned his master’s from the University of Chicago. Continue Reading →

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NAACP Labor Chair is ready to fight for jobs

She says no one would call her a ‘well behaved’ woman
The new faces of the Mpls NAACP: MSR’s story on the new officers of the Minneapolis Branch of the NAACP (“Minneapolis NAACP swears in new members,” Feb. 27) revealed among other things that women now constitute a majority of the new leadership. This week, meet Tee McClenty, head of the Branch’s new labor committee. 
 
 

By Isaac Peterson

Contributing Writer

 

Labor activist Tee McClenty, originally from Camden, New Jersey, has a long history of service and of representing labor interests. As she tells it, “I’ve been a labor activist for a very long time. I worked at a long-term care facility, where I was a union steward. Continue Reading →

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Ruben and Lalah play well in the Twin Cities

By Raymond Jackson
Contributing Writer

 

 

 

 

On a great feeling Sunday evening, Ruben Studdard and Lalah Hathaway started their 2014 tour at The Dakota Nightclub, located in downtown Minneapolis, in grand fashion!  

Although the previewing marked Ruben as the marquee, once the show began it was quite apparent that there was no specific marquee involved in this performance. They were both simply fantastic. They began the show together with a five piece band and two background vocalists, who too, were really good. During the opening, two duet ballads, the dinner crowd knew they were destined to receive an after dinner mint, that would be the most favorable they had tasted in quite some time. Continue Reading →

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The Art Cunningham Show: over two decades of Black history through Black media

 

 

By Dwight Hobbes
Contributing Writer

 

There is no more effective means of communicating than the media, particularly the visual media and especially television, since every home has at least one set. How far, after all, do you think the present celebration of Black History Month would’ve got without the media? Its inception came back in 1926, founded by Carter G. Woodson as Negro History Week. It is undeniable the impact media communication has had, growing from the first celebration by Black United Students at Kent State University in 1970 to America acknowledging Black History Month in 1976, President Gerald Ford making it official.  

All this is said to underscore that Art Cunningham, creator-host of The Art Cunningham Show for 23 years, put the issues-oriented program on the air as a means to get voices of the African American community expressed that otherwise went unheard. Continue Reading →

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Cable networks using Black sitcoms to draw more viewers

 

 

By Charles Hallman
Staff writer

According to Nielsen, Blacks watch almost 40 percent more television than any other group. As a result, Black-themed sitcoms and reality shows seemingly are now hot properties on cable. But not on just BET, TV One and Centric, three Black-oriented channels, but several mainstream outlets as well: TV Land has The Soul Man. Nick at Nite has Instant Mom. Tyler Perry’s House of Payne has been on TBS since 2007, and Meet the Browns debuted on the same channel two years later in 2009. Continue Reading →

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