Alexis Hornbuckle

Recent Articles

The WNBA: where it’s been, where it’s going

How to better promote the WNBA
 

 

Although it’s America’s longest running women’s pro league, the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) is still seen by too many as below major league status. The MSR talked about this and related issues with coaches, players, analysts, fans and league officials throughout the league’s 17th season; their insights are included in this multi-part series on the WNBA.  

The WNBA has over the course of its existence used season-long promotions that frankly bombed. “We Got Next” and posing star players in evening gowns are just two sad examples. Prior to last spring’s draft, the W launched a new logo as part of what League President Laurel Richie called its “rebranding initiative.” Then came its “3 To See” campaign, for which the president credited ESPN with the season-long theme. Continue Reading →

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The WNBA: where it’s been, where it’s going

WNBA media coverage still far short of equitable 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second of a four-part series
 

Although it’s America’s longest running women’s pro league, the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) is still seen by too many as below major league status. The MSR talked about this and related issues with coaches, players, analysts, fans and league officials throughout the league’s 17th season; their insights are included in this multi-part series on the WNBA. According to Scoreboard for Equality, a new on-line blog that began this summer monitoring women’s sports coverage, America’s longest running women’s pro league championship didn’t make the New York Times’ top sports stories, with just a brief mention in both USA TODAY and the Washington Post. Sports Illustrated had four writers covering baseball playoffs, but only one for the WNBA playoffs. ESPN’s almighty SportsCenter aired the Minnesota Lynx’s three-game sweep of Atlanta only after five other sports stories were aired. Continue Reading →

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To flop or not worries men more than women players

 

 

“Flopping” has been a part of basketball since the Flintstones. Lately it’s become a hot issue for NBA male players, but in the W there appears to be little concern. This season, 19 NBA players were warned about flopping, which is when a player intentionally falls down while guarding an offensive player to draw a foul. Five of these players were fined $5,000. Seven more got hit during the playoffs. Continue Reading →

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Hoops odds and ends—Free at last: Charde Houston traded to Phoenix

 

 

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

If there was an appropriate theme to summarize last week’s announcement that the Minnesota Lynx traded Charde Houston to Phoenix, it should be:

Free at last! The 6-0 forward, who was a 2009 WNBA All-Star, has been a virtual no-show, making only cameo appearances in Coach Cheryl Reeve’s rotation the last two seasons. Houston barely logged eight minutes a game, and zilch during last year’s playoffs. Although she never publicly complained, I did — but I never really got my questions about her lack of court time answered. I wondered aloud how a player who wasn’t hurt, and just two years earlier averaged 13 points a game, couldn’t get off the bench except for timeouts. Continue Reading →

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WNBA off-season action slow

 

 

 

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Will the Minnesota Lynx re-sign Charde Houston, a restricted free agent? Nobody’s asking this question, which is typical among the local mainstream media who ignore WNBA off-season moves, but the veteran forward is among 21 restricted free agents around the league still unsigned for the 2012 season. Since Feb. 1, WNBA teams now can negotiate with their own “core” and “reserved” players, as well as “restricted” and “unrestricted” free agents. Minnesota already has re-upped both Taj McWilliams-Franklin (core) and Jessica Adair (reserved), and did a sign-and-trade with Alexis Hornbuckle and sent her to Phoenix Feb. Continue Reading →

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