Angela Davis

Recent Articles

Film documents tragic price some women pay for being young and naïve

Movie Review

By Dwight Hobbes

Contributing Writer 

 

Debbie Peagler will never be nearly as well known as Angela Davis (see MSR’s review last week of the documentary film Free Angela). Still, she is no less a sister whose saga warrants close attention and even calls for outcry. After all, Angela did escape the noose and will never be forgotten as long as history is recorded. Crime After Crime (Own Documentary Club) painstakingly documents the tortured life and tragic death of Deborah Denise “Debbie” Peagler. A misstep by this domestic violence victim, desperately at wits’ end trying to get out from under a soulless abuser, unwittingly sent her from bad to worse. Continue Reading →

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Free Angela provides a brilliant, invaluable look into America’s history

 

Movie Review

By Dwight Hobbes

Contributing Writer

 

It is sad to see how complacent we Black people have grown since the 1960s. The bourgeoisie blithely transitioned from a populace who once vowed “We Will Overcome” to a generation whose abiding principle now is “I have overcome.” You’d scarcely believe there was a time when Black America was determined to revolt against entrenched, institutionalized racism by, as Malcolm X said, any means necessary. This country’s rulers realized back then that the bill had come due. Too many African Americans were longer shuffling along, head bowed, yassuhing and no ma’aming. Too many had their shoulders squared, braced to put their feet in the nation’s behind. Continue Reading →

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Young Black woman killed for refusing to have an abortion

 

 

We have a different kind of silent abuse going on in the Black community associated with domestic abuse that no one wants to talk about. Therefore, being the truth deliverer, I shall. The sister was 21 years old, four months pregnant, and was killed by a hit man for refusing to have an abortion. A courageous Black woman identified as Shamari Jenkins refused to meet the demands of her boyfriend to have an abortion. Police said Carlton Bryan, 21, of Windsor hired a hit man to kill this wonderful sister because she refused to have an abortion. Continue Reading →

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Guthrie Theater’s smug and offensive “Clybourne Park” perpetuates the illusion of a “post-Civil-Rights” society

 

By Peter Rachcleff, Community Voices/Twin Cities Daily Planet

 

Clybourne Park is a significant play. It won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in Drama and, in 2012, was awarded the Tony Award for best Broadway drama. A cursory glance over the schedules for regional theater in the past two years suggests that it is the most widely produced play in the country. The Guthrie has made a major investment in the play, from hiring a top notch production team and cast to building an enormous, complex set, and booking the play for a lengthy run of eight weeks. On the night I attended, most of the apparently full house (around 700) at the McGuire Proscenium Stage—almost all of whom were, like me, white—loved the play. Continue Reading →

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Black women hammering at media’s glass ceiling — Mainstream offers them ‘dismal’ opportunities

 

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

A new study points to a “stubborn gender inequality” affecting females in U.S. media. “The Status of Women in the U.S. Media 2013” study, released in March by the Women’s Media Center (WMC), found that women are seen less often than men on Sunday morning news shows and are often relegated to write “pink topics” such as food

and family stories. The overall employment of women in television newsrooms “remains flat,” according to the study. It also shows that “story framing and descriptions of women still too often fall into lazy stereotypes.”

“A gaping divide” in gender parity exists at both traditional and newer news sites. Male bylines outnumber female bylines by two-thirds “even in coverage of issues of great importance to women,” notes the WMC report. Continue Reading →

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Book explores, honors powerful African American women

It doesn’t take a clairvoyant to predict Lakesia D. Johnson’s Iconic: Decoding Images of the Revolutionary Black Woman (Baylor University Press) is headed for sustained popularity. It may take a minute, since college publishers don’t have the publicity machinery of big houses. But, once word gets around, Black women, more than a few White ones and brothas with the sense to be interested in what’s going on for sistahs are going to snatch this up like it’s tomorrow’s news. The writing’s a bit clunky and on the academic side (after all, Johnson, J.D., Ph.D., is assistant professor of gender, women’s and sexuality studies and gender, women’s and sexuality studies  at Grinnell College in Iowa). But, don’t hold that against this timely, at some points invaluable, study. Continue Reading →

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On crime, racism, and distrust of police

 

“When you shoot somebody, that’s not the only person that you’re killing.”  

— Nona Gaye, Marvin Gaye’s daughter, testifying after his death

 

I attended a neighborhood meeting on racism. Afterward I mentioned the comments I heard in that meeting regarding law enforcement to one of our law enforcement officials. “It’s hopeless,” he said when I conveyed the negative comments from the seminar, “when that’s how they feel about us.”

So I stepped out from behind his hopelessness and asked to meet with another public relations representative from the local police department to see what could be and/or what is being done about this impasse between the electorate and their peace officers. Broad publicity has been given to the cases of O. J. Simpson, Rodney King, and Henry Louis Gates (and his meeting with President Obama) when each of these celebrities of color had run-ins with the law. Another famed activist, Angela Davis, is a proponent for the rights of inmates and speaks out on prisons as factories that house an inordinate number of young Black men compared to their ratio in the American population. Continue Reading →

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The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975: Documentary recalls era of radical struggle

 

 

A film review

By Brittany Lewis

Contributing Writer

 

On Friday, February 24, the group Solidarity will host a free screening of the film The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 at the Capri Theater in North Minneapolis. The social hour begins at 6 pm with the film showing at 7 pm. This is a free event. Presented as a group of Swedish filmmakers’ — as “outsiders” — observation of America from 1967-1975, this film tells a more nuanced story of Black radical struggle in the United States. Although this film does not aim to provide its viewers with a comprehensive history of the rise of the Black Power Movement, it does highlight the growing divide between two Americas — Black and White. Continue Reading →

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