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Treating skin of color

Conclusion of a 4-part column

 

 

Most skin diseases occur in people of all nationalities, regardless of their skin color. Certain problems encountered in the skin are more common in people with different hues of skin, and sometimes a disorder seems more prominent because it affects skin color. This week concludes our review of these disorders and their treatments.  

 

Tinea capitis

Tinea capitis, also known as ringworm, is endemic in African American children. Any child with a scaling, itching scalp should be thoroughly investigated for tinea capitis. Continue Reading →

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Treating skin of color

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most skin diseases occur in people of all nationalities, regardless of their skin color. Certain problems encountered in the skin are more common in people with different hues of skin, and sometimes a disorder seems more prominent because it affects skin color. This week continues our review of these disorders and their treatment.  

Keloids

Throughout evolution, our skin has become quite skillful at repairing any sites of injury or damage. Once the integrity of the skin barrier has been interrupted, invaders such as bacteria, fungus, and virus can penetrate the skin and important

bodily fluids can leak out. Continue Reading →

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Treating skin of color

Most skin diseases occur in people of all nationalities, regardless of their skin color. Certain problems encountered in the skin are more common in people with different hues of skin, and sometimes a disorder seems more prominent because it affects skin color.  

Variations in skin color

Skin color is determined by cells called melanocytes. Melanocytes are specialized cells within the skin that produce a pigment known as melanin. Melanin is produced and stored within special structures, known as melanosomes, contained in the melanocytes. Continue Reading →

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Grapefruit juice can make some medications toxic

 

By Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD

Dr. Crutchfield, my brother tells me his doctor told him that he should not drink grapefruit juice while on a new cholesterol medication. Why is that?  

Grapefruit juice is a natural, delicious, nutritious drink that has positive health benefits. Some estimates say that as many as 20 percent of all Americans consume grapefruit juice on a regular basis. Scientists discovered several years ago (quite by accident) that grapefruit juice binds to and blocks a certain enzyme in the gastrointestinal tract where medicines are absorbed. Continue Reading →

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What is an allergic skin reaction?

Dear Doctor: My skin is red and itchy. How do I know if I am having an allergic skin reaction? An allergic skin reaction is a common skin rash that occurs when your skin comes into contact with a substance you have an allergy to. It is often called “allergic contact skin dermatitis.” There are other types of allergies, namely those from things you eat (peanuts, for example) or breathe in (pollen and seasonal allergies). This article will only talk about the rash one gets from substances that touch or “contact” the skin. The most common natural allergic contact dermatitis is from a plant oil found in the leaves of the poison ivy plant. dye for beards and moustaches

dye for beards and moustaches

Why should I care about an allergic skin reaction? Continue Reading →

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Bunions can be a big pain in the big toe

Early care can reduce risk of developing disabling foot problem
 

By Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD

 

Dear Doctor: My aunt told me she has a painful bunion. What is that?  

Abunion is large bump that forms at the base of the big toe where the bone of the big toe attaches to the bones of the foot. When this happens, the big toe usually bends inwards, sometimes at a very extreme angle. The bone of the foot, called the metatarsal, gets pushed outwards forming the bump, called a bunion. Continue Reading →

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Yes, African Americans can get skin cancer!

Dark skin is not immunity, so be aware of the risks
 

We’ve just completed February, African American History Month. Among much else, it can serve as a fitting reminder about a myth that has persisted for too long: African Americans (and those with darker skin tones) can’t get skin cancer. In fact, among the African American population, melanoma — the most serious kind of skin cancer — is much more deadly than among Caucasians. In fact, it does not matter what color your skin is: Everyone is prone to developing skin cancer. You may have heard that naturally dark-skinned people have less chance of getting skin cancer, and that is true. Continue Reading →

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Eye floaters — when to ignore them, when to seek help

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear Doctor: When I look at anything with a bright background or at the sky, I see wiggly, squiggly lines. What are those?  

Those are called harmless retinal floaters. Eye floaters are small wiggly lines or spots that appear and move around in your field of vision. As you mention, they may be seen most often when you look at anything bright/white or a blue sky. Eye floaters can be disturbing, but they usually don’t affect your vision. Continue Reading →

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That blood-red spot in your eye is most likely no cause for alarm

By Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD

 

Dear Doctor: This morning, when I looked in the mirror, I noticed I had a big, red bloodspot in the white part of my eye. I don’t remember injuring my eye. How did this happen?  

Most likely, you are suffering from a condition known as a subconjunctival hemorrhage. This is a surprisingly common occurrence. Fortunately, the vast majority are completely harmless. Continue Reading →

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What is endometriosis?

 

 

 

 

 

 

and Nathan Guimont

 

Endometriosis is a very common female condition and is defined as the presence of tissue that lines the uterus (or womb) in a location where it is not normally supposed to be. Normally during a woman’s monthly cycle, a mucus tissue (the endometrium) in a women’s uterus builds up and thickens in preparation for fertilization of an egg. When fertilization does not occur, the lining of the uterus breaks down and is discharged at the end of the cycle called menstruation or “period.”

This process is guided by female sex hormones. The endometrium tissue can also grow in other parts of the body, outside of the uterus, and when this occurs it is called endometriosis. The growths are benign but can respond to the hormones as well circulating in your body and guiding menstruation. Continue Reading →

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