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Organizing to unite the African world

Omali Yeshitela discusses his work in ‘the ongoing struggle’

By Dwight Hobbes
Staff Writer


The only thing more dangerous than the truth is someone committed to telling it with the courage of his or her convictions and without regard to politically correct protocol. That characteristic has distinguished such iconic individuals as Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Dick Gregory and Martin Luther King. While his isn’t a household name, Omali Yeshitela nonetheless is to be reckoned with as a statesman of integrity and as a voice that refuses to compromise. When Yeshitela, chair of the African People’s Socialist Party, relates to revolution, it’s not from an armchair. He was there, sleeves rolled up, holding the front line in the 1960s Civil Rights Era throughout the thick of it all, as the U.S. saw its most momentous upheaval since the Civil War. It isn’t lost on him that both of these landmarks confronted the subjugation of African America. This country bit off more than it could chew by enslaving Black people and has spent hundreds of years choking on it ever since. So, it couldn’t be more fitting that Yeshitela addressed the First Annual Twin Cities Malcolm X Conference this past Saturday in North Minneapolis. There is, of course, no Malcolm X Day, despite the fact that he and Martin Luther King, Jr. fought, lived and died for the same principle of equality. White liberals look on King as a sort of kindly, non-threatening figure. Malcolm, on the other hand, scared them witless. His memory still casts a disquieting pall, lest a successor emerge. Someone like Omali Yeshitela. Continue Reading →

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Conference celebrated legacy of Malcolm X

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer


Last weekend’s first-ever Malcolm X conference in the state was entirely devoted to the memory of the late civil rights leader who was assassinated in 1964. The first annual Minnesota Malcolm X Conference, held May 17 at North High School, was attended by over a hundred people of various ages who did not come close to filling the auditorium

“We had hoped for a full house,” admitted University of Minnesota Professor Rose Brewer, a member of a four-person panel discussion during the morning session. Later in the day, Omali Yeshitela pointed out that this was a good turnout based on similar events he had visited around the country. “Malcolm X is a giant of a man,” Brewer said. “We need to study him very carefully.”

“Malcolm changed my life,” said Dr. Ezra Hyland. Continue Reading →

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Black athlete manifesto: Can today’s players take a stand for Black consciousness?



Are today’s Black athletes that oblivious to their history? Many either don’t know or don’t want to know when Black athletes were consistent targets for the then-and-still-majority-White media. Times, they say, are different now — Black athletes don’t have to go through what Jim Brown, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Muhammad Ali did, along with their contemporaries as well as those who opened the doors for them. It’s sad that today’s Black athletes don’t know, or don’t want to know, just how much the Browns, Abdul-Jabbars and Alis took their social consciousness seriously, even at the expense of their illustrious careers. That these men and others like them cared more about representing their heritage, their Blackness, than endorsement deals. Continue Reading →

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