Black women

Recent Articles

Defining health disparities

Dr. Crutchfield, what do people mean when they use the term “health disparity”?  

Merriam-Webster defines disparity as “the state of being different.” The term “health disparities” refers to several conditions. It almost always refers to differences in groups relating to their socioeconomic status, race and/or gender. It can also mean differences in the presence of certain diseases within groups. It can mean the outcomes of disease treatment in these groups. It can mean the quality of health care and access to healthcare services that exist within these groups. Disparities can also be caused by a lack of efficiency within the healthcare system. As a result of the lack of efficiency, some studies (Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies) have speculated that approximately $50 billion are spent wastefully every year in the U.S. By reducing or eliminating health disparities, there could be a significant savings to the healthcare system accompanied by an overall increased quality of health care. Continue Reading →

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I remember when the community supported us

By Lovell Oates
Contributing Writer

 

Conclusion of a series

Last week: If the bridge is not built to reconnect these [incarcerated] brothers…in the end, the work being done in the community will become more difficult because a chain is only as strong as it’s weakest link.  

I remember when Joe and Tyrone were outcast in the community and brothers and sisters would check their behavior. In fact, their families wouldn’t allow it. I talk about Joe and Tyrone in terms of being incarcerated, yet we all know the community is full of these types of brothers that have never been to jail, which makes it worse for the simple fact that the brother in jail at least has a chance to evaluate his situation. Joe and Tyrone, in the free world, don’t even know that they are clowns and fools because it’s normal to everyone around them. Continue Reading →

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A sports reporter’s spring notebook cleaning

Marlene Stollings’ second hire on her Gopher women’s basketball coaching staff is Nikita (Niki) Dawkins. She is a 23-year coaching veteran who has been a VCU assistant coach the last two seasons and held similar positions at Old Dominion, Michigan and Ohio State, her alma mater. In a released statement, Stollings called Dawkins, whose duties include recruiting coordinator, “one of the top assistants in the country.” She joins Tiffanie Couts, who Stollings named director of basketball operations. Couts was a grad assistant last season at VCU. The women are the only two Blacks on the staff. Continue Reading →

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‘Ordinary African American woman’ LisaGay Hamilton has an impressive acting resume

 

 

By Charles Hallman
Staff writer

Second in a multi-part series

Despite her impressive filmography, LisaGay Hamilton humbly points out that her name isn’t a household one. “I’m an ordinary African American woman,” she told the MSR in a recent phone interview. “Personally I am not exotic looking. I’m not curvaceous… I just have to be really great — really, really good.”

Hamilton nonetheless pointed out that she tries not to take acting jobs “just to make money. Continue Reading →

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LisaGay Hamilton and Yolanda Ross star in new John Sayles thriller

 

 

By Charles Hallman
Staff writer

 

The first of a four-part series that takes a look at Black women in the movie industry

 

Go For Sisters, a John Sayles movie, made its local debut in Minneapolis December 13 at Landmark Theatres’ Lagoon Cinema. The film is currently scheduled to run for one week only. The 122-minute film (which is unrated, but not recommended for persons under 15 due to violence, drug scenes and strong language) is about two women, once friends growing up who then grew apart. They reunite after 20 years to find a missing son, with the help of an ex-police detective. Sayles said in his director’s statement, “I usually don’t write screenplays with specific actors in mind. Continue Reading →

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The Artist’s Way: Sarah White on Music, Motherhood, and Her New Band

 

 

 
By Junauda Petrus
Contributing Writer
 “You can always break rules and challenge limits. You can always be the boss of your art, because it comes from the soul. I really love when the art becomes the boss of me and moves and molds me into its process,” says Minneapolis native and soul musician Sarah White. We are at a Northeast Cafe on a graciously sunny September afternoon. She is squeezing our interview in between her environmental science homework and meeting her oldest daughter, Iza, at the bus stop. Continue Reading →

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Up-and-coming playwright Junauda Petrus shows There Are Other Worlds

 

 

By Jamal Denman

Online Editor

 

Junauda Petrus had been living in New York when she was initially inspired to begin the creative process of writing and developing the concept for the gripping play entitled There Are Other Worlds.  Her original idea for the performance, which sold out each night of its four-night run, was a little different than the work which was presented at the Open Eye Figure Theatre in Minneapolis April 25-28, 2013. At first Petrus just “wanted to do an aerial performance piece featuring all Black women” and combine those elements with “poetry vignettes,” and was inspired by Ntozake Shange’s For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf. But during the creative process, the concept eventually transformed into a powerful and poignant story that touched on a number of topics considered taboo, such as the treatment of Black women, rape, murder, and the prison industrial complex in the United States. One element of the original concept that remained was the aerial performance, something Petrus wanted to exhibit. She describes aerial performance as “a circus art that deals with hanging apparatuses,” where acrobatic movements are incorporated with the use of materials hung from the ceiling. Continue Reading →

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Black women hit hard by chemical dependency

 

As the weather begins to improve and we plan for all the cookouts, graduations, holidays and birthday parties, one thing that will not be forgotten is the drinks. It would not be a party without them, right? Some of us cannot wait for happy hour to start right now so we can go and get two-for-ones. Do not have any shame in your game. Many of us have been there, needing something to take the edge off from a stressful day. Continue Reading →

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Abortion a threat to Black women, Black families, Black population

 

 

I appreciate responses from Spokesman readers regarding the truths being provided in my column. The documentation is irrefutable. I challenge anyone to disprove the content of my column by focusing on other mentions instead of Ms. Sanger. I ask anyone to disprove other mentions in my column such as that Blacks make up 12 percent of the population but 35 percent of abortions in America. Disprove my suggestion that Ms. Sanger was friendly with the KKK and other racist groups. Continue Reading →

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A healthy me for a healthy you

When we speak about health, oftentimes physical health comes to mind first. Physical health is important for everyone to be attentive to. Just as equally, we need to be attentive to our mental and spiritual health as well. As Black folks, we have been mentally, psychically and spiritually abused on multiple levels. However, we have found ways to keep pushing. Continue Reading →

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