Branch Rickey

Recent Articles

42 shows Jackie Robinson as a flesh-and-blood hero

 

 

A movie review 

By Dwight Hobbes

Contributing Writer

 

Were baseball, back in 1947, the boring, high-priced waste of time and money it is today, you’d have to wonder why Jackie Robinson went to the trouble. In those days, though, it was an exciting sport to watch and, of course, to play. Athletes loved the game. They had to. Unlike today’s lackadaisical, overpaid prima donnas, even the stars of the sport then worked jobs in the off-season, selling furniture, pumping gas, farming, what have you. Continue Reading →

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This week’s Entertainment spotlights!

 

 
The Music
 
Beenie Man
Fri., Apr. 12, 10 pm • Epic, 110 N. 5th St., Mpls., 612-332-3742 or epicmpls.com

Grammy award-winning Jamaican reggae artist and self-proclaimed “King of Dancehall.”

 

 

 

 

 
Fatoumata Diawara 
Fri., Apr. 12, 7 pm • Cedar Cultural Center, 416 Cedar Ave. S., Mpls., 612-338-2674 or www.thecedar.org • Catch the Midwest debut by Mali’s new music sensation, who has been wooing critics and lighting up stages around the world with her radiant voice, coolly infectious Afro-pop, and smoking live band.  

 

 

 

 

Eric Kamau Gravatt
Fri., Apr. Continue Reading →

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This week’s Entertainment spotlights!

 

The Music
 

Rahsaan Patterson

Thurs., Apr. 4, 8 pm • Dakota Jazz Club & Restaurant, 1010 Nicollet Mall, Mpls., 612-332-1010 or www.dakotacooks.com • With a sound that evokes comparison to Stevie Wonder, Chaka Khan and Prince, Rahsaan Patterson has become a force in the R&B/neo-soul world. For over 15 years Patterson has released five albums, toured constantly and has collaborated with a number of soul music luminaries.  

 

 

 

Toots and the Maytals 

Sat., Apr. 6, 9 pm • Mill City Nights, 111 5th St. Continue Reading →

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Jackie Robinson’s fight against racism: the untold story

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Jackie Robinson’s legacy and life story has been told and retold over the years, but mostly it has been focused on his historical breaking of baseball’s color line after World War II. “The thing that people don’t know about him [is] that my father was on fire for social justice from the very beginning,” said Sharon Robinson on her father during a recent visit to the Twin Cities during the RBI World Series. A prime example of this was when Jackie Robinson got court-martialed as an Army officer: “He was stationed at Fort Hood, Texas as a second lieutenant” after graduating from officer training school in 1943, explained his daughter. “When he graduated, they [the Army] didn’t want him to be an officer so they sent him to the middle of nowhere, in the Deep South and Jim Crow.”

One day while riding on a local bus into town, Robinson saw “a light-skinned Black woman, but the bus driver thought she was White,” continued Sharon. Since he knew her, Robinson sat in the “White” section — the front of the bus. Continue Reading →

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Robinson honored with North Side baseball clinic

 

 

 

 
By Charles Hallman
Staff Writer

 

The city of Sanford, Florida today is known as the place where 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was killed. But almost 70 years ago, the city unfortunately earned another dubious distinction: Jackie Robinson wasn’t allowed to play there. He was the only Black member of the Montreal Royals, the Brooklyn Dodgers’ AAA club, and Sanford was the parent team’s spring training site. Because Jim Crow also was intact at the time, the rookie Robinson wasn’t allowed to stay or eat anywhere his White teammates went in the town. Reportedly, “a large group of White residents” went to the mayor and demanded that Robinson immediately leave town in 1946. Continue Reading →

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