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All-Star starters

For the millions of you Major League Baseball fans who did not pass on your patriotic duty to vote for your favorite 2014 All-Stars, the votes have been counted and the starters are:

American League starters: first base, Miguel Cabrera, Detroit; second base, Robinson Cano, Seattle; shortstop, Derek Jeter, New York; third base, Josh Donaldson, Oakland; catcher, Salvador Perez, Kansas City; DH, Nelson Cruz,

Baltimore; outfield Mike Trout, California, Adam Jones, Baltimore, and Jose Bautista, Toronto, who was the number-one vote-getter, receiving 5.6 million votes. National League starters: first base, Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona; second base, Chase Utley, Philadelphia; shortstop, Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado; third base, Aramis Ramirez, Milwaukee; outfield Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh, Carlos Gomez, Milwaukee, and Yasiel Puig, Los Angeles. The Twins had two players selected as reserves — catcher Kurt Suzuki and reliever Glen Perkins. Here’s an interesting symmetry: This year’s mid-summer classic, the 85th All-Star game, is being held in the same city, Minneapolis, as the 1985 All-Star Game. For the most part, all those that have been voted in are very deserving and, as always, many deserving stars were not — at least not yet — selected. Continue Reading →

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2014 All-Star Classic lineup

According to DEREK REUBEN, director of the Inner City All-Star Classic, the rosters are set for the annual boys’ and girls’ basketball contests featuring the metro area’s top seniors. Reuben, who was named the state’s Mr. Basketball after an outstanding career at Minneapolis North, started the boys’ game in 1994 with then-teammate and friend RALPH CROWDER. At the urging and persistence of the late community and sports activist KWAME MCDONALD, a girls’ game was added in 2001.  

This year’s Inner City All-Star Classic will be held Sunday, June 8, at the University of St. Thomas. Continue Reading →

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Brenda Bell Brown: art as a natural part of everyday life

By Dwight Hobbes
Contributing Writer

 

Writer, performer and visual artist Brenda Bell Brown, renowned Twin Cities fixture, utilizes the concepts of art and culture as more than an aesthetic pursuit. She successfully realizes them as a community resource. Point in case, a mere partial listing of her accomplishments includes membership in such prestigious institutions as the Black Storytellers Alliance, the Archie Givens Foundation Black Writers Collaborative, and, in her native Tennessee, the Blues City Cultural Center. She earned as well a 2010 Minnesota State Arts Board Cultural Community Partnership Grant and twice sat as a cultural liaison to the Minnesota State Arts Board. Indeed, to Brown, culture and community are inextricably part and parcel of life itself. Continue Reading →

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Inclusive candidates for Borton’s replacement

 

 

The news wasn’t even an hour old before a local daily newspaper posted on their website a list of possible candidates to succeed Pam Borton as Minnesota women’s basketball coach. Not one, however, of the eight current head coaches and six assistant coaches suggested for the position was of color. The Gophers probably hadn’t gotten back in town after last Thursday’s loss at South Dakota State before Minnesota AD Norwood Teague simply inserted the final date on Borton’s “Dear Jane” dismissal letter — the same type letter that former coach Tubby Smith received last year. Every time I saw Teague at a Gopher game during the season, he looked like he was just counting days, hours and minutes before he could zap her out. The former coach had been on shaky ground since last season. Continue Reading →

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Can a high-tech thermostat save money and energy?

By Roddy Scheer 

and Doug Moss

Contributing Writers

 

 

Spending $200 or more to replace that older, still functioning thermostat with a new whiz-bang “smart” variety might seem like a waste of money, but it can be one of the best small investments a homeowner can make, given the potential for energy and cost savings down the line. The coolest of the bunch of new smart thermostats, the Nest, was created by former Apple employees who had been instrumental in designing the original iPod and iPhone years earlier. This simple looking round thermostat is reminiscent of old-school thermostats that one would manually adjust by turning the temperature dial. But the auto-awake feature that turns on the bright blue digital display when someone walks nearby gives the Nest away as an ultra-modern piece of high-tech gadgetry. The Nest’s software “learns” the habits in a given space by logging when inhabitants tend to be home and awake and noting when they tend to turn up or down the heat — and then sets a heating/cooling schedule accordingly. Continue Reading →

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President Obama visits St. Paul

 

 

By Charles Hallman
Staff Writer

President Barack Obama, in St. Paul on Wednesday, reiterated his vow he made earlier in his State of the Union address in January that he will take action when needed if Congress won’t. “I’m just going to do what I can…” proclaimed Obama during a nearly 20-minute speech to an enthusiastic overflowing audience at the Union Depot in downtown St. Paul. Continue Reading →

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Florida State wins final BCS title

Did the SEC blow it? The incredible Auburn Tigers, a two-touchdown underdog to favorite unbeaten No.1 Florida State, led 21-3 late in the first half, trying to win the final BCS Championship game and the eighth straight for the powerful Southeastern Conference. But the Seminoles are back on top of college football for the first time since 1999. Incredible freshman quarterback Jameis Winston became the first freshman quarterback to win the Heisman Trophy and the National Championship in the same year. He led Florida State to their comeback win over determined Auburn. Continue Reading →

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Web series addresses stereotypes about African Americans

 

 

By Charles Hallman
Staff writer

 

Angela Tucker two years ago pitched her series idea on challenging racial stereotypes of Blacks. The third season of Black Folk Don’t premiered December 2 on BlackPublicMedia.org, the National Black Programming Coalition (NBPC) website. “Season three is going to spark conversations in homes and offices around the country as well as online,” predicts Black Public Media Digital Media Director Nonso Christian Ugbode. “People take sides and even question the audacity of the assertions that are raised in the show.”

A writer, director and producer, Tucker wrote on her blog a couple of years ago that she prefer “[regular Black] people that had original points of views and were articulate” rather using “being Black” experts. “At first, we were going to reach out to people via social networks… Continue Reading →

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Monogamous: To Be or Not to Be?

The one thing you don’t expect to see in any of the Bible Belt states (where most have amended their constitutions to define marriage between one man and one woman) is an organization promoting polyamory. Last month at Atlanta’s Pride Parade the group Atlanta Polyamory Inc. did just that — and in the wide-open light of day. The result was the shock, awe, and disgust of a mixed group. Atlanta Polyamory Inc.’s purple-lettered banner read, “Polyamory: having simultaneous close emotional relationships with two or more other individuals.” While many religious conservatives might argue that the legalization of same-gender marriage and shows like HBO’s Big Love — about a fictional polygamist Mormon family — plant seeds to destroy the conventional family unit, we have to ask ourselves is monogamy a natural instinct in us or is it a social construct, which was obviously devised to protect and to regulate the institution of heterosexual marriage? To be non-monogamous in this culture carries pejorative and judgmental connotations for both heterosexuals and LGBTQs. Continue Reading →

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Entrepreneur creates dentures with special appeal to people of color

Entrepreneur creates dentures with special appeal to people of color
 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

In this week’s segment of our multi-part series on Black business, we take a look at a profession that is on the decline among African Americans. According to the American Dental Association diversity data, the number of Black dentists has been declining since the mid-1990s. As a result, both locally and nationally dental technician Randy Jackson is among a rare breed these days. Before the 1960s, dentists did all the work. During that time technician training in dental colleges and vocational schools was created, says Jackson, who attended vocational school for dental technicians after he served in Vietnam in 1975. Continue Reading →

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