Charles Hallman

Recent Articles

Money blocks low-income children from a good education

All schools, including charter schools, must do a better job teaching our children, stated Marquette University Professor Howard Fuller recently at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Fuller, a founding member of the Black Alliance for Educational Options (BAEO), former Milwaukee Public Schools superintendent, and current board chair at a Milwaukee charter school, was the featured keynote speaker at the second annual Minnesota Charter School Conference July 29 at McNamara Center. Continue Reading →

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Few U.S. Blacks turn out for international soccer

Soccer, a sport mainly played with no hands, elicits strong emotions among its players and the fans that follow it. Sometimes these emotions are gutter-like, such as several “high-profile” racist incidents that have occurred in recent years. “I think it’s a global political problem, not just in soccer,” says Olympiacos F.C. Strategic Advisor Christian Karembeu when asked about it. His club played Manchester City last Saturday at the U of M’s

on-campus football stadium as part of the 2014 International Champions Cup series. “When we talk about racism, we need to be together to find solutions,” Karembeu told the MSR after his club’s 5-4 shootout win. Continue Reading →

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Remembering Lillian Anderson, Minneapolis’ first civil rights director

Longtime friend Josie Johnson offers tribute to ‘a tough sister’
 

By Charles Hallman
Staff Writer

 

Asked which adjectives she’d use to describe Minneapolis’ first civil rights director Rev. Lillian D. Anthony, her longtime friend and former colleague Josie Johnson said “committed, determined and persistent” easily came to mind. A graduate of Lincoln (MO) University and an associate minister in the Presbyterian Church, Anthony passed away at age 88 on June 26 in Louisville, Ky. According to her obituary, Dr. Anthony “transformed her home into the first African American Heritage House Museum founded in Louisville.”

However, Anthony did this as well while living on Minneapolis’ North Side in the late 1960s, recalls Johnson. “She converted her home in ways like a museum. I had known Lillian for many, many years, way back to the 1960s. Continue Reading →

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Great WNBA games most worthy of sports talk

 

To politely say I’m tired of the Kevin Love talk is understating it. First, he pulls out of an MLB celebrity softball game under the guise that he might have been booed, since the game was being played next door from the gym he plays in. Then last week Love announces he’s pulling out of playing with Team USA, reportedly “because of his current status.”

Huh? He’s still under contract with the Minnesota Timberwolves for another year. He’s not a LeBron James or Carmelo Anthony, two players who were eligible for free agency. Continue Reading →

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Ageism, sexism, racism: trouble at Fox

I usually don’t put much stock in or give much attention to sideline reporters, who I firmly believe are simply a made-for-TV creation that serves more the reporter than conveying any meaningful information to the viewer. Nonetheless, what happened recently to one such reporter did catch my attention. Pam Oliver, with nearly two decades of sideline reporting experience, is now relegated to the second-team sidelines, meaning she’s on the secondary telecasts rather than the national game. She’s been replaced by someone 17 years her

junior, 36-year-old Erin Andrews, on Fox’s NFL telecasts this fall. Andrews was the sideline reporter who stuck a microphone in Richard Sherman’s face right after he made the winning play for his team in the Super Bowl. Continue Reading →

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NASCAR internships create a ‘multicultural pipeline’ to the racing industry

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

For nearly 15 years, NASCAR selects college students each summer for its diversity internship program, which intends “to expose multicultural college students to employment opportunities” in a sport that has historically struggled to attract more Blacks and other people of color. Hakeem Onofowokan, Jr., a third-year University of Minnesota law student, was among 14 students selected for this year’s 10-week paid internships. A school professor encouraged him to apply for it, says Onofowokan in a recent   phone interview. He worked in NASCAR’s public affairs office: “I thought it would be a good fit,” he noted. According to NASCAR officials, the sport “[becoming] more reflective” of the country’s growing diversity is fundamental in order to “maintain the health of the sport.”

Vice-President and Chief Human Resources Officer Paula Miller told the MSR that the internship program is only one aspect of NASCAR’s mission to create “a multicultural pipeline” for Blacks and other people of color to the sport of racing. Continue Reading →

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New MPS director to focus on Black male achievement

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) now has in place their new office that will specifically look at Black male student achievement. Michael Walker, a longtime district employee and most recently Roosevelt High School assistant principal, was selected as the first director of the district’s Office of Black Male Student Achievement. He begins work July 28. The district’s Black males are “a very narrow group,” admits MPS CEO Michael Goar when oft-asked why this student population is receiving so much focused attention. Eliminating the achievement gap between Black males and their MPS peers has presented “persistent challenges for the community” as well for the district, stated Goar. Continue Reading →

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Ellison proposes friendship societies

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

U.S. Congressman Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) and five other congressional Democrats last week sent a letter to both President Barack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry urging the administration “to continue efforts to find a cease-fire agreement between Israel and Palestine.” Earlier this month, while speaking to a group of visiting young African leaders at the University Of Minnesota Humphrey School Of Public Affairs, Ellison said, “I think that the bes

t thing to do is for the United States to put more pressure on both sides to resolve the conflict.”

He made it clear to the 25 visitors in town for a six-week leadership program that his views were his own and not those of the U.S. or Congress. The congressman added that he believes that the United Nations has become outdated and badly need restructuring. “It’s a voluntary organization made up of countries. It’s a model that’s old and needs a lot of work. The world has changed a lot…

“I believe that if you have a leader of a country committing atrocities on civilians, the world can’t stand by and let it happen. Continue Reading →

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Visiting Africans prepare to become ‘transformative leaders’

Representing 18 countries, they say they are learning the most from each other.  
By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

The University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs this summer hosted 25 young African professionals in its first year as part of the Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders. The Center for Integrative Leadership operates under the auspices of the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI), which the Obama administration started in 2010 to “spur growth and prosperity, strengthen democratic governance, and enhance peace and security across Africa.”

Several of the 25 fellows, who have nearly completed their six-week leadership program, recently talked to the MSR.

“This program was partially appealing to me because it has an African focus and recognizes that there is opportunity for us to learn from other Africans,” noted Danielle Manuel, the deputy for infrastructure policies and strategies in the Department of Transport and Planning in South Africa. There were 50,000 applicants for the fellowships, from whom 500 were selected earlier this year to come to the States this summer, explained Helawi Beshah of Ethiopia. “I’m an architect [and] work for the government” at a local university, he said. Continue Reading →

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Lynx guard Wright is back and catching up

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

She won’t let on where her rehabilitation stands on a scale of 10. The only thing Monica Wright would report that she’s getting there. “In my mind, I’m a 10,” the fifth-year Minnesota Lynx guard recently told the MSR. After an unexpected arthroscopic surgery on her left knee just before training camp on April 25, the 5’-10” player didn’t make her 2014 season debut until June 15. After her return from off-season play overseas, Wright recalled experiencing unusual soreness in the knee, and the subsequent MRI result was “a huge surprise,” she admitted. As expected, upon her return, Wright also experienced her rhythm off a bit in her “mental training camp,” wanting to get back to full strength as quickly as possible. Continue Reading →

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