Civil Rights Act

Recent Articles

Clinton decries growing U.S. political polarization

Ex-president, in Humphrey school speech, sounded alarm that we are ‘drifting apart’
 

By Charles Hallman
Staff Writer

Barack Obama, or for that matter Jimmy Carter, or even former president Bill Clinton himself would not have been elected U.S. president if it wasn’t for the 1964 Civil Rights Act, said Clinton during a June 9 speech last week at the University of Minnesota Northrop Auditorium. The school’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs, named after the late senator and vice president Hubert H. Humphrey, has co-sponsored a yearlong series of events to reflect on the 50th anniversary year of the law’s passage that’s largely believed to have ended de jure segregation in this country, primarily in the South. University of Minnesota Trustee Emeritus Dr. Josie Johnson, who introduced Clinton, told the audience that everyone should “challenge misinformation and seek truth.” She reiterated afterwards to the MSR that “the focus on justice, equity, civil rights, etcetera” must continue. “I wish we could create an environment where we could talk together,” she said. “Until we can pass legislation that opens opportunities for all of our children, and when our children understand their place in history and in society, until we do that I don’t think the future of our civil rights resonates with our children. Continue Reading →

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Civil rights tour opened students’ eyes to Black history

 Spring break trip field trip encouraged thoughts of college, attending HBCUs
 

By Charles Hallman
Staff Writer

 

Over 40 Minneapolis Public Schools’ (MPS) Black high school students, instead of spending spring break on a sunny beach, traveled down south by bus on a “Civil Rights Research Tour.” The five-day tour (March 31-April 5) took the students to Montgomery, Alabama and Atlanta, Georgia and stopped at several historic sites, including the 16th Street Baptist Church, where four young Black girls died in 1964. For some students, the trip also included stops at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Four of the participants spoke to the MSR last week about their experience. “It helped me learn more about my history,” said Edison junior Nailah Heard. “I never heard of the 16th Street Church at all,” added Edison’s classmate Jasmine Valentine. Continue Reading →

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Moving from Tolerance to Allophilia:

Expand Human Rights Enforcement in Minnesota
 

By the Council on Black Minnesotans

Fifty years ago, on July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson displayed courage and innovation by taking the unprecedented national step to attack the heart of America’s close friendship with discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin by enacting the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Minnesotans such as Roy Wilkins, Vice President Hubert Humphrey and Vice President Walter Mondale played a huge role with bringing about this historic day. In fact prior to the passage of the civil rights act, Minnesota passed the Minnesota State Act for Fair Employment Practices in 1955, which prohibits discrimination in employment based on race, color, creed, religion, or national origin and in 1961 passed laws to prohibit discrimination in mortgage lending and in the sale, rental, or lease of real property. These acts banned discrimination and represented the beginning of the fulfillment of the hopes and dreams of many in the costly and painstaking journey to build a society with equal access and opportunity for all. It also provided an external control mechanism to move America from absolute prejudice to tolerance. Continue Reading →

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Black History Month: now more than ever

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Marc H. Morial

Guest Commentator

 

“There is no more powerful force than a people steeped in their history. And there is no higher cause than honoring our struggle and ancestors by remembering.” — Lonnie Bunch, founding director, National Museum of African American History and Culture

 

Ever since the 2009 election of Barack Obama as America’s first Black president and the 100th anniversary of the National Urban League in 2010, the perennial debate about the need for Black History Month has intensified. Some have questioned the need for a special month to recognize the many unknown and unsung achievements of African Americans. With Obama as president, the logic goes, we have now achieved Dr. King’s dream of a non-racial America where everyone is judged by the content of their character, not the color of their skin. I wish it were so. Continue Reading →

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In final analysis, Title IX created ‘unprecedented opportunities’

 

After 40 years of existence, Title IX still raises the hair on the necks of those critics who strongly feel the federal law hurts men’s sports. These naysayers continue to propagandize this lie. However, more often than not it seems that White females have been the main beneficiaries of the equity legislation since its passage 40 years ago. “I think it has been a law that helped all women,” says University of Wisconsin-Madison law student Valyncia Raphael. “But I think right now the conversation does not acknowledge that there are different types of women who have benefited from the law in different ways.”

Raphael made her observation during a national Title IX conference held last spring at the University of Michigan. Continue Reading →

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