civil rights

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Remembering Lillian Anderson, Minneapolis’ first civil rights director

Longtime friend Josie Johnson offers tribute to ‘a tough sister’
 

By Charles Hallman
Staff Writer

 

Asked which adjectives she’d use to describe Minneapolis’ first civil rights director Rev. Lillian D. Anthony, her longtime friend and former colleague Josie Johnson said “committed, determined and persistent” easily came to mind. A graduate of Lincoln (MO) University and an associate minister in the Presbyterian Church, Anthony passed away at age 88 on June 26 in Louisville, Ky. According to her obituary, Dr. Anthony “transformed her home into the first African American Heritage House Museum founded in Louisville.”

However, Anthony did this as well while living on Minneapolis’ North Side in the late 1960s, recalls Johnson. “She converted her home in ways like a museum. I had known Lillian for many, many years, way back to the 1960s. Continue Reading →

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Council on Black Minnesotans has new director, new agenda, new vision to get beyond tolerance

 

 

 

 

 

By Vickie Evans-Nash

Editor-in-Chief

 

In October 2012, Edward McDonald was appointed director of the Council on Black Minnesotans (COBM). The process began when he was approached by friends and colleagues who thought he would serve well in the role. Raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and completing his undergrad studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth in 1980, he received a post-graduate degree as a legal assistant and completed his graduate studies at Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government. He returned to the Twin Cities in the early ’90s, working as public policy manager for Family and Children’s Service. Now married for 32 years with two adult children, he has lived in Oakdale, Minnesota since 1994 but says he is not disconnected from areas with a larger population of people of African descent. Continue Reading →

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Obama linking Selma to Stonewall divides Black community

 

President Barack Obama’s inaugural address was the most inclusive speech a president has ever given. It was delivered on the 27th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and the president honored King’s legacy when he eloquently spoke of how the many U.S. liberation movements, both current and historic, are interconnected. “We, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths — that all of us are created equal — is the star that guides us still; just as it guided our forebears through Seneca Falls, and Selma, and Stonewall.”

As an African American lesbian, whose identity is linked to all three movements, I felt affirmed. I applaud the president’s courageous pronouncement. Some African Americans, however, felt “dissed” by the president’s speech. Continue Reading →

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Lawyers’ committee submits testimony to senate hearing: ‘Ending the School-to-Prison Pipeline’

 

By Lawyers’ Committee staff

Contributing Writers

 

The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law (LCCRUL) applauds Senator Richard J. Durbin for convening the important hearing “Ending the School-to-Prison Pipeline” before the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Human Rights on December 12. This hearing will expose the deep inequality in disciplinary practices plaguing our public schools and its damaging effects on our youth. The school-to-prison pipeline refers to the practice of pushing students out of the classroom and into the justice system through use of harsh exclusionary discipline policies. Within the past two decades, many schools have increased their reliance on law enforcement officers and exclusionary policies, such as out-of-school suspension and expulsion, as a means of reducing school disruption. As a result, too many of our most vulnerable youth find themselves excluded from the classroom setting, arrested, and/or referred to juvenile court for what might be viewed as common misbehavior. Continue Reading →

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Report examines coverage of LGBT issues in Black, Latino media

 

FIRST OF A TWO-PART STORY

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

 

A new report from The Opportunity Agenda points out that favorable public opinion about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people of color is slowly growing among Blacks. The national communications, research and advocacy organization released “Public Opinion and Discourse on the Intersection of LGBT Issues and Race” in September. It examined Black and Latino newspapers, Black magazines and Black online media over a two-year period (2009-2011), and found several common themes. Among them:

• Black newspapers and online news sites consider LGBT issues newsworthy. • The six main storylines found in Black newspapers, with HIV/AIDS receiving the most attention, include: homophobia, bullying and discrimination, culture, tension between gay rights and civil rights, religion and same-sex marriage. Continue Reading →

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Black lawmakers almost killed Title IX

Landmark bill caught in race vs. gender  equity wrangling

 

Long before Title IX, Black females have been participants in sport. “There [always] has been a strong African American women presence in sport,” notes Ohio State Sport Humanities Associate Professor Sarah Fields, author of “Race v. Gender: How Constructions of Title IX Have Failed Women of Color.”

Blacks and other female athletes of color in action scenes were included in racially motivated “endangered exhibits” at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. “In the 1930s…there were strong [women] basketball leagues in some Black colleges, and they played against each other,” continues the professor. Continue Reading →

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