College Sports

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Ever wonder how much college sports cost? Here are more numbers.



All 23 University of Minnesota sports teams generate revenue, but only football, men’s basketball and men’s hockey in the last two years have been profitable, according to reports supplied by the school. Each sport’s total operating revenue includes but is not limited to: ticket sales, state or other governmental support, NCAA/conference distributions, broadcast rights, program ad concessions sales, parking, licensing and advertisements, and endowment and investment income.  


After expenses, football ($32 million) in 2012 and 2013 made nearly twice what men’s hoops earned ($18.6 million) and thrice what men’s puck ($9.5 million) made.  The other Gopher programs, however, spent at least twice as much as they reportedly made:

Women’s hockey — $1.6 million in revenues; expenses — $2.4 million

Women’s basketball — $1.2 million in revenues; expenses — $5.1 million

Rowing — $874,000 revenues; expenses — $2.2 million

Women’s track/cross-country — $837,000 revenues; expenses — $2.4 million

Baseball — $767,000 revenues; expenses — $2.2 million

Women’s swimming & diving — $648,000 revenues; expenses — $1.7 million

Women’s gymnastics — $418,000 revenues; expenses — $1.3 million

Wrestling — $550,000 revenues; expenses — $1.8 million

Volleyball — $404,000 revenues; expenses — $2.3 million

Softball — $359,000 revenues; expenses — $1.7 million

Women’s tennis — $307,000 revenues; expenses — $975,000

Men’s swimming & diving — $294,000 revenues; expenses — $1.5 million

Men’s golf — $252,000 revenues; expenses — $1 million

Women’s golf — $232,000 revenues; expenses — $885,000

Soccer — $308,000 revenues; expenses — $1.5 million

Men’s gymnastics — $182,000 revenues; expenses — $1 million

Men’s tennis — $162,000 revenues; expenses — $896,000

Men’s track and field/cross-country — $377,000 revenues; expenses — $2.2 million


To those opponents who profess college sports spend too much and bring in little to show for it, these numbers support their argument. But for those who argue that women’s non-revenue sports (all but basketball and volleyball) fall in this category as loss leaders, their male non-revenue counterparts are just as much ‘losers.’

Finally, in the final analysis, running a Division I sports program is expensive. Based on the aforementioned figures, we now know just how much. Continue Reading →

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Would a Robinson Rule be just another ruse?


The only thing I like about a proposed “Eddie Robinson Rule” for college sports hiring is that it is being named for the late Grambling football coach. Otherwise, if the proposed law is modeled after the NFL’s Rooney Rule, I’m afraid it’s a recipe for deception, false hopes and tokenism. This week’s “Another View” published in the MSR sports section briefly discusses Richard Lapchick’s latest campus leadership report, where it notes again just how White (nearly 90 percent) of the campus leadership positions are.  

Here are the latest diversity report’s “lowlights”:

Coaches of color decreased by three, from 18 in 2012 to 15 in 2013. There was a two-percent drop in Black head football coaches (now 9.6 percent) from last year even though Black football players at the same time went up nearly three percent. Continue Reading →

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Conference shuffle the big news for U-M men’s hockey







New Big Ten league promises much — will it deliver?  

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer


College sports in recent years have seen conferences either expand or implode both in football and basketball. Now it’s trickled down to men’s hockey. In what organizers called “an unprecedented day of college hockey discussions in the Twin Cities,” last week the two newest men’s hockey conferences held their respective media days September 19. “We’re ready to go in a new season and a new conference,” proclaimed U-M Coach Don Lucia in St. Continue Reading →

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Top performers in boys’ hoops

The boys’ basketball season is off and running, and some of the state’s top players are already serving notice that they will be heard from before the season is over. Check out these top performances so far:

QUINTON HOOKER (Park Center) — The leading candidate for Mr. Basketball dropped 26 in a 72-70 victory over top-ranked Apple Valley. TYUS JONES (Apple Valley) — Considered by many as the top junior in the country, the point guard scored 20 in a loss to Park Center. RILEY DEARRING (Minnetonka) — The University of Wisconsin recruit had 16 in a 79-71 win over Robbinsdale Cooper. BRIDGE TUSLER (Osseo) — The all-state football player scored 16 points from his point guard position, helping the Orioles defeat Eastview 50-40. Continue Reading →

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College baseball player aspires to be a major leaguer

As young African American males think about playing professional sports, primarily football and basketball, there is a sport out there that is just as lucrative as those, but not very many Black males play — it’s baseball. Adrian Turner, a transplant to Minnesota by way of Grambling State University, is striving to reach his dream of playing Major League Baseball (MLB). Turner was born in Tuscon, Arizona, and due to his father’s job he ended up in Kenosha, Wisconsin. At St. Joseph High School, a private school in Kenosha, he was a three-sport athlete. Continue Reading →

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New Gophers AD says increasing diversity is ‘high on my radar screen’


Has the role of today’s big-time college athletic director changed? We recently put that question to Norwood Teague, who was hired in April to succeed Joel Maturi as University of Minnesota athletics director. “It’s multi-faceted,” explained Teague, formerly the AD at VCU for the past six years, on his new job. “You have to be very cognizant of a lot of different areas.”

Even more so today, the athletic director is more CEO than cheerleader. “[College sports] has become a bigger business and a larger operation. Continue Reading →

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WNBA now on Olympic break


Mid-season month off affects teams differently

By Charles Hallman
Staff Writer


With the entire U.S. women’s Olympic basketball team entirely composed of WNBA players, the league schedule is now on break until August 17. The interruption has both good and not-so-good consequences for the league’s teams and players. “First and foremost, I think it is a terrific opportunity to showcase the talents of the WNBA,” observes League President Laurel Richie on this summer’s Olympic Games in London. “It’s an incredible opportunity for them to compete on the international stage.”

However, is the month-long stoppage of play bad timing or momentum-killing for teams such as Connecticut and San Antonio, who respectively are playing the best ball in the WNBA? The Sun is on a five-game win streak, and the Silver Stars went into the break on a nine-game roll. Continue Reading →

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Will the next Gophers athletic director be Black?

Search process makes this possibility not likely

Will Blacks be included in the “thorough and inclusive process” University of Minnesota President Eric Kaler announced last week on his search for the school’s next athletic director. Let me count the reasons they probably won’t be. One, the school is paying an Atlanta search firm $100,000. According to the Sports Business Journal, Division I schools annually conduct up to 45 searches for an AD, football or basketball coach — spending anywhere from $30,000 to $100,000 using outside agencies. (A University spokesman told me last week that the money will be coming from two sources: the athletic department and Kaler’s presidential account.)

The business magazine also says these search executives are “in an extraordinarily powerful position,” which lends to reason number two — Minnesota hired Parker Executive Search, whose senior leadership is all White, and all but one of its seven “principals/associates” also are White. Continue Reading →

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Nonprofit founder receives national honor


Guidance of elders, engaging parents keys to NdCAD’s success

By Charles Hallman
Staff Writer

The Champions of Change program, created as part of President Barack Obama’s Winning the Future initiative, recently honored Gevonee Ford, the founder/executive director of the Network for the Development of Children of African Descent (NdCAD), a nonprofit family education center in St. Paul. Ford was among eight “Champions” January 12 at the White House recognized for the work they are doing to better their communities, said an official White House press release. “Mr. Ford has continued a tradition of Black leadership by working with hundreds of children and their families each year to increase reading proficiency and learning confidence amongst students…as well as increased parental and community involvement,” wrote White House Public Engagement Associate Director Erin Hannigan on Ford, who has worked in early childhood and education in Minnesota for almost 30 years. “I knew I had been nominated by someone from the [Obama] administration a few months before,” Ford told the MSR after he returned from his first-ever trip to the nation’s executive mansion. Continue Reading →

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Leah Cotton: Gopher guard has junior-year growing pains



It is known as a sophomore slump when a second-year player struggles, but thus far there is no known term when this occurs during a player’s third season. Call it what you want, but this is what U-M junior guard Leah Cotton currently is experiencing. 

Cotton averaged nine points in five non-league games, but since she was inserted in the Minnesota starting lineup by Minnesota Coach Pam Borton, the 5-8 guard’s scoring average is only 6.7 points in conference match-ups. Only three games has she shot 50 percent or better as a starter as well. Her seven-point average overall is three points less than the 10.7 points per game Cotton had in her sophomore year last season. Earlier this season, the young lady brimmed with confidence. Continue Reading →

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