Depression

Recent Articles

Getting out of our own way

Doing better requires that we confront our self-defeating behaviors
 

It’s hard not to notice the plight that Black people are in across the nation — well, across the world. However, let’s focus solely on America. Black people are always near the top, if not number one, in every statistic for something bad. We really do not need statistics to point these things out. Just go on Broadway, Lake Street, Payne, Arcade, Penn, Rice Street, etc. Continue Reading →

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Good sleep is essential to optimal health

Lack of healthy sleep has an impact on your emotional, physical and spiritual health. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, insufficient sleep is a public health epidemic and 50-70 million Americans have sleeping impairment. There are nearly 100 identified sleep/wake disorders. One of them is insomnia, which can be defined as the inability to fall asleep, remain asleep, or get the amount of sleep an individual needs to wake up feeling rested. Its symptoms include difficulty falling asleep, frequent wake-ups during the night, waking up too early in the morning, daytime sleepiness, difficulty concentrating, and irritability. Continue Reading →

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What is depression?

 

 

 

 

 

By Dr. Dionne Hart, MD

The brain is vital to thinking, personality, mood, and daily function. Much of the brain’s functions remains a mystery; however, there is evidence depression is related to chemical changes in the brain. Depression is a medical illness that affects an individual’s mood, thought process, and function. A patient with depression may experience sadness most days, crying spells, anxiety, irritability, and an inability to feel enjoyment. Depressed patients often have difficulty concentrating, making decisions, completing goals, performing well at work or school, and recalling events. Continue Reading →

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Little Black girls need daddies, too

As the emotional impact of the George Zimmerman murder acquittal begins to settle, the focus has once again returned to the importance of having healthy men in the lives of young Black boys. This has been the same focus since the 1980s. Rightfully so, as Black males are being targeted and victimized at alarming rates. This is true. However, I believe it is incumbent upon us, as Black folks, to not forget about Black girls as well. Continue Reading →

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What is­ bariatric surgery?

By Dr. Laura July, MD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bariatric surgery is also called weight-loss surgery. These are procedures performed on dangerously obese people for the purpose of losing weight.  

Why should I care about bariatric surgery? 

Over the last 30 years, obesity rates have doubled for adults and tripled for children. Sixty-seven percent of adults in the U.S. are either overweight or obese, with 18 million being morbidly obese, meaning 100 pounds or more overweight. There are more than 40 health problems associated with obesity including things such as Type II diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, high cholesterol, arthritis, infertility, liver and gallbladder disease, depression, sleep apnea, and certain types of cancer. Continue Reading →

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How to get all the vitamin D you need

 

 

 

Welcome, MSR readers, to a new section you will see appear regularly in these pages, something we call Green2Green. Most of you by now have heard of the green movement to clean up our planet, stop the waste of precious natural resources, and get climate change under control. What is not always clear is just what this movement means to each one of us in our everyday lives. Nor is it always clear how this movement includes environmental justice issues of particular concern to communities of color. And finally, it is not always clear how the green movement can also save us green, as in Benjamin green, and is creating new opportunities for productive careers. Continue Reading →

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Better Way To Life founder finds fulfillment helping the homeless

News Analysis

By Dwight Hobbes

Contributing Writer

It is the job of politicians, more than actually solving the public’s problems, to make sweeping statements about how well they supposedly are solving the public’s problems. That’s why a Gallup Poll was trotted out last year extolling that unemployment had fallen to its lowest level since 2008. Never mind that December of that year started out with the National Bureau of Economic Research stating what everyone who works for a living already knew: In 2008, the U.S. economy was a catastrophe, being officially in recession since 2007. And that, officially or not, as far back as 1982, when Gary “U.S.” Bonds recorded “Out of Work,” it might as well have been the new national anthem. Since no one has ever been known to worry about lobbyists for the homeless vote, politicians let the Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program die in 2012, leaving the disenfranchised in worse shape than ever. If we aren’t in an actual depression, all that’s missing is Wall Street high-fliers going sky-diving without their parachutes. Continue Reading →

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Adding race to the ACE (Study)

Currently, in social service circles across the nation the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study is becoming a focal point on understanding and treating clients. Dr. Vincent J. Felitti originally conducted the ACE study in 1985. The original study was created from a weight-loss program for people with obesity. That study produced a result that showed that many of the participants unconsciously used their obesity as a shield against unwanted sexual attention, and many had been sexually or physically abused as children. The study was reproduced in the 1990s with the addition of Dr. Robert F. Anda. Continue Reading →

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Do you know how to respond to a mental-health crisis?

Mental Health First Aid provides the needed skills
By Vickie Evans-Nash

MSR Editor-in-Chief

First aid and CPR classes have been taught across the nation for years now, giving people with no medical training lifesaving skills in the event of a medical crisis. People suffering from mental health problems can pose a life-threatening crisis as well. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota offers lay people a class called Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) that will give them the skills needed to respond in cases of a mental-health crisis. “In a similar way to how regular first aid teaches people BAC (breathing, airway and circulation), in mental health first aid there’s an acronym ALGEE. It stands for assess for risk of suicide or harm, listen non-judgmentally, get appropriate information and support, encourage appropriate professional help, and encourage appropriate self-help,” explains Anna McLafferty, the course instructor. Continue Reading →

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Join me on a journey to a new and better self

 

Years ago, after I delivered my wonderful daughter, I found myself eating out of depression; love of course played a part, but so did broken dreams. I also felt anxious, overwhelmed, and at times hopeless. When my daughter was three months old we would wake up in the middle of the night, and I would make myself a stack of pancakes, hoping the fatigue and loneliness would go away. Food became a sense of comfort and relief. I had a million and one excuses as to why I couldn’t exercise. Even when I did muster the energy to exercise, I wasn’t consistent, had little faith in the process, and saw little change in my appearance. Continue Reading →

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