dermatologist

Recent Articles

Defining health disparities

Dr. Crutchfield, what do people mean when they use the term “health disparity”?  

Merriam-Webster defines disparity as “the state of being different.” The term “health disparities” refers to several conditions. It almost always refers to differences in groups relating to their socioeconomic status, race and/or gender. It can also mean differences in the presence of certain diseases within groups. It can mean the outcomes of disease treatment in these groups. It can mean the quality of health care and access to healthcare services that exist within these groups. Disparities can also be caused by a lack of efficiency within the healthcare system. As a result of the lack of efficiency, some studies (Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies) have speculated that approximately $50 billion are spent wastefully every year in the U.S. By reducing or eliminating health disparities, there could be a significant savings to the healthcare system accompanied by an overall increased quality of health care. Continue Reading →

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What are keloids and why should I care about them?

 

Keloids are a very common type of scar that can be unsightly, painful and itchy. Anyone can develop keloids, but people of color develop them 15 times more frequently than others. Keloids may also run in families. They commonly occur on the ears but are also seen on the upper chest, back and arms. These scars are often a result of an injury or acne scaring, and can be very difficult to treat.  

What causes keloids? Continue Reading →

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Why should I care about DPNs (face flesh moles)?

Dermatosis papulosa nigra (DPN) is a unique skin condition seen primarily in persons of color. It appears as small, dark bumps and most commonly affects the forehead, cheeks, and neck. The bumps increase in size and number over time, initially appearing in people ages 20-30. Some people call them “flesh moles.” Bill Cosby, Morgan Freeman and Condoleezza Rice are notable people with the condition. It tends to occur slightly more frequently in women than in men. Continue Reading →

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What is vitiligo, and why should I care?

By Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD 

 

Vitiligo is a condition where white patches occur on the skin. This was a condition that Michael Jackson had. It can be particularly troubling when patients have tan, brown or dark brown skin, as the spots are much more obvious. Socially and psychologically, vitiligo can be devastating and have profound quality-of-life effects.  

What causes vitiligo? 

Vitiligo is a condition where the cells in the skin that produce color (melanocytes) either die early, or are inappropriately destroyed by the patient’s immune system. Continue Reading →

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Why should anyone care about warts?

By Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD 

 

Warts are rough surface bumps that can occur mainly on the hands and feet but may occur anywhere on the body. Warts can be very tender, painful, can get infected, and are transmissible. Some warts can be associated with a certain type of reproductive cancer. Because this is an infectious disease with other healthcare ramifications, most warts should be treated. Discuss treatment options with your doctor. Continue Reading →

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Ten ways to add 10 years to your life

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Charles E. Crutchfield II, MD, and 

Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD 

 

1) Get an annual physical 

examination. 

Make sure it is from a doctor you are familiar with, and try to maintain continuity of care by scheduling an examination with the same doctor every year. The examination should include the standard blood tests for your age including, but not limited to, the evaluation of blood sugar, thyroid and cholesterol. Your physical examination should also evaluate blood pressure, weight, listen to your heart and lungs, and include a full skin exam. Women, specifically, should schedule a Pap smear and mammogram, if appropriate. Men, specifically, should have an age-appropriate prostate evaluation. Continue Reading →

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Doctor’s Advice for Your Good Health

 

By Charles E. Crutchfield III, M.D.

 

Dr. Crutchfield, what can I do improve the quality of my skin, especially in these dry winter months?  

Great question. Walk into the skin care/cosmetic area of any major department store, and it is dizzying to see the hundreds, if not thousands, of choices for skin care. To complicate matters, there are sales people wearing white coats, looking like either mad scientists or doctors, who are all too eager to recommend their company’s multi-step skin care program. Even in our homes, we are flooded with late-night infomercials touting the latest products that promise to solve your skin-care woes. The good news is, smart skin care can be a simple four-step process: cleansing, hydration, protection and correction.  

1.  Cleansing

Cleansers with either no detergent or a very low detergent value help preserve the natural oils in your skin. You don’t need harsh cleansers or exfoliants; just use a cotton washcloth. Your skin will naturally exfoliate itself. Several good over-the-counter cleansers include Vanicream Cleansing Bar, Cetaphil, and Dove Unscented Cleansing Bar. Everyone’s skin chemistry is different, so experiment until you find a product that works best for your skin type. Continue Reading →

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