Division I

Recent Articles

Metro-based athletes make their marks

It’s not often that two former metro area athletes with the same last name (no relation) accomplish great things during the same time period. Realizing this provided me the opportunity to acknowledge their accomplishments. These accomplishments are preceded by a question and answer followed by information detailing their contributions and a brief history of each athlete’s connection to the metro area high school scene. One athlete featured is developing into one of the top NCAA Division I sprinters in the nation, while the other is finding his way as a guard in the NBA.  

The track phenom

Question: What former metro area girls’ basketball and track and field phenom was recently named Track Athlete of the Week at her Division I school? Continue Reading →

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Black female strength coach a true rarity

Conclusion of a two-part column

 

If it’s hard being a Black female coach in any sport, it’s more than likely harder still for a Black female strength coach. Mia Erickson of the Mayo Clinic Performance Center in Rochester, Minn. was the only Black among the four-person sport science panel at the U of M Tucker Center Women Coaches Symposium in February. “That’s just the way it is on seeing [strength] coaches that look like me,” she admits. “First of all, I’m in a male-dominated field, so there are not going to be a lot of female coaches. Continue Reading →

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Greater diversity unlikely in post-Borton Gopher women’s basketball

 

 

Thus far, Gopher AD Norwood Teague is two-for-two in firing coaches in consecutive years. He fired Pam Borton as the school’s women’s basketball coach, seemingly less than 24 hours after her last game last week. She got the ziggy in less time than Tubby Smith got axed around this same time nearly a year ago. Borton was my fifth coach I covered as the longest tenured Gopher women hoops beat writer, She had her faults — no coach is perfect, and for whatever reason, she couldn’t convince too many local Black females to play for her.  

Former Gopher Leah Cotton, who played for Borton (2010-13), recently spoke to the MSR while in town for the team’s Senior Night March 2. Continue Reading →

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March graduation rate madness

 

 

A quick prediction for this year’s NCAAs — Black male basketball players’ graduation rates will remain virtually unchanged. While nearly everyone is filling out their brackets, the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) released on Monday its annual study on the academic performance of the players in the NCAA Division I tournament teams. The study’s primary author, TIDES Director Dr. Richard Lapchick, compares the graduation rate data of Black and White male basketball student-athletes.  

“There is not much good news to report as almost every category examined remained the same or got worse,” wrote Lapchick. The women teams’ report was released Tuesday. A more detailed analysis will be in next week’s “Another View” in the MSR print edition. Continue Reading →

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Ever wonder how much college sports cost? Here are more numbers.

 

 

All 23 University of Minnesota sports teams generate revenue, but only football, men’s basketball and men’s hockey in the last two years have been profitable, according to reports supplied by the school. Each sport’s total operating revenue includes but is not limited to: ticket sales, state or other governmental support, NCAA/conference distributions, broadcast rights, program ad concessions sales, parking, licensing and advertisements, and endowment and investment income.  

 

After expenses, football ($32 million) in 2012 and 2013 made nearly twice what men’s hoops earned ($18.6 million) and thrice what men’s puck ($9.5 million) made.  The other Gopher programs, however, spent at least twice as much as they reportedly made:

Women’s hockey — $1.6 million in revenues; expenses — $2.4 million

Women’s basketball — $1.2 million in revenues; expenses — $5.1 million

Rowing — $874,000 revenues; expenses — $2.2 million

Women’s track/cross-country — $837,000 revenues; expenses — $2.4 million

Baseball — $767,000 revenues; expenses — $2.2 million

Women’s swimming & diving — $648,000 revenues; expenses — $1.7 million

Women’s gymnastics — $418,000 revenues; expenses — $1.3 million

Wrestling — $550,000 revenues; expenses — $1.8 million

Volleyball — $404,000 revenues; expenses — $2.3 million

Softball — $359,000 revenues; expenses — $1.7 million

Women’s tennis — $307,000 revenues; expenses — $975,000

Men’s swimming & diving — $294,000 revenues; expenses — $1.5 million

Men’s golf — $252,000 revenues; expenses — $1 million

Women’s golf — $232,000 revenues; expenses — $885,000

Soccer — $308,000 revenues; expenses — $1.5 million

Men’s gymnastics — $182,000 revenues; expenses — $1 million

Men’s tennis — $162,000 revenues; expenses — $896,000

Men’s track and field/cross-country — $377,000 revenues; expenses — $2.2 million

 

To those opponents who profess college sports spend too much and bring in little to show for it, these numbers support their argument. But for those who argue that women’s non-revenue sports (all but basketball and volleyball) fall in this category as loss leaders, their male non-revenue counterparts are just as much ‘losers.’

Finally, in the final analysis, running a Division I sports program is expensive. Based on the aforementioned figures, we now know just how much. Continue Reading →

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Mpls native converts success as player into coaching know-how

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Her players haven’t as yet called her “Coach,” but Kachine Alexander says she can’t wait for one of them to challenge her to a game of one-on-one. “I think most players still call me ‘Cash,’ admits the first-year Concordia University assistant women’s basketball coach. “They’ve been itching for me to play with them ever since I’ve got here. I keep telling them they don’t want those problems.”

Alexander’s playing pedigree suggests, however, that the CU players might want to reevaluate their itches: a prep standout at Benilde-St. Margaret’s High School, an all-state and all-metro performer, and a Minnesota Miss Basketball finalist in 2007. Continue Reading →

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Message to student-athletes: ‘No means no!’

 

Apparently based on recent events, two suggested prerequisite courses for all college studentathletes at all three NCAA division schools should be, first, an English class on the true meaning of the word “no,” and second a class on “making right choices.”

A former Hamline University men’s basketball player was recently charged with felony second-degree assault after he allegedly hit a woman in the face while in Spokane, Washington on New Year’s Eve. When she heard about the incident, Crystal Flint briefly chatted with one of her sons: “I told him that no one knew how it was going to turn, [but] somebody has to do the morally correct thing and go…at least tell somebody,” she recalls. If Flint, herself a former University of Minnesota student-athlete, is successful in convincing her youngster to do the “morally correct thing,” it will help eradicate the notion of individual willfulness embedded in too many young people’s minds that falsely tells them that whatever they do, rightly or wrongly, is acceptable these days. This notion we adults have somehow, consciously or unconsciously, planted and watered in them, thus enabling them and bankrupting them morally. This is even more so if the young person has been tagged a “star athlete” in his or her formative years, depriving them of understanding and of consistently hearing the word “no.” Sometimes we see a dangerous pattern developing and allow it to go unchecked. Continue Reading →

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Up-and-coming hoopster girls to watch

The girls’ basketball season has begun with eight of the state’s top players already signed with Division I schools. If you ever get a chance to get to a game, check these players out. (The college each signed with is in parentheses). NIA COFFEY (Northwestern): While averaging 15.7 points per game, the 5-9 guard led Hopkins to the Class 4A state championship. ALLINA STARR (Auburn): The 5-10 guard averaged 16 point while helping DeLaSalle capture their second straight Class 3A crown. Continue Reading →

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Up-and-coming hoopster girls to watch

The girls’ basketball season has begun with eight of the state’s top players already signed with Division I schools. If you ever get a chance to get to a game, check these players out. (The college each signed with is in parentheses). NIA COFFEY (Northwestern): While averaging 15.7 points per game, the 5-9 guard led Hopkins to the Class 4A state championship. ALLINA STARR (Auburn): The 5-10 guard averaged 16 point while helping DeLaSalle capture their second straight Class 3A crown. Continue Reading →

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