Hmong

Recent Articles

Ford Foundation’s new president: ‘This is not about our brand’

Favors ‘programs…informed by those affected whom we seek to empower’
Editor’s Note: In September, 2013, Darren Walker (DW) became the second African American and 10th president of the Ford Foundation, America’s second largest philanthropy organization with $500 million in annual giving. After a stint in international law and banking, Walker served as the COO of a nonprofit agency in New York before moving to the foundation world, first arriving at the Rockefeller Foundation before being tapped to fill a vice president slot at Ford in 2010. He was interviewed in his New York office by Khalil Abdullah, national reporter for New America Media (NAM). NAM: What excites you most about taking on the presidency of the Ford Foundation? DW: I have a chance to make a difference by leading a remarkable institution committed to social justice when the very notion of social justice is being contested. Continue Reading →

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Former mayor to mayor-elect: Get public support for a change agenda

By Charles Hallman
Staff Writer

 

Minneapolis in a few weeks will see a new mayor and several new faces on the city council. Betsy Hodges was elected the city’s first White female mayor, and the election also achieved three other “firsts” — the first Somali (Abdi Warsame), the first Latina (Alondra Cano) and the first Hmong (Blong Yang) among seven new city council members. “One of the things I think is awfully important is that the city government [now] really reflects the constituents that live in the city,” said Sharon Sayles Belton in an MSR interview. “We always questioned whether or not the wards would ever support us being able to elect more people of color to the city council or other units of government. “It’s clear, given the changing demographics in Minneapolis and with the right political construct, it is absolutely possible. Continue Reading →

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National, local controversy greets opening of new state health exchange

Critics say Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox ad campaign misfires with communities of color
 
By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

MNsure, the state’s health insurance exchange program, debuted the signup process on October 1. Officials during an October 4 conference call with reporters, including the MSR, estimated that 5,000 accounts were opened during the first week. “We think it’s been going very well,” remarked MNsure Executive Director April Todd-Malmlov. She added that many people did “anonymous shopping” but did not disclose specific numbers. “Minnesota is unique,” said Todd-Malmlov. Continue Reading →

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There’s no love in the gang

 

Summer’s coming soon — time for any conscious or concerned parents to make a decision. Young boys and girls must make a decision, too. There’s no love in street organization or what people call gangs. It’s time to step away, get out and separate. It’s not illegal to be an organization, but it is illegal to engage in crime through an organization. Continue Reading →

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Early childhood education: What does culture have to do with it?

 

 

News Analysis

By Sheila Regan

Contributing Writer

 

How do varying cultural backgrounds affect the need for and the value of early education? What we’re missing, said Betty Emarita at a February 8 forum on early childhood education, is data-driven discussions. While there’s data on community trauma, “There’s little data

on family strengths, especially in low-income communities.”

Betty Emarita grew up in a tiny village in North Carolina, which had a combined elementary, junior high and high school. It was a very poor area, and the African Americans living in the community were mostly farming as sharecroppers. “Most girls dropped out of school by the eighth grade,” she said. Continue Reading →

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The Good Wife Works – Gypsies, Jews, Hmong and Blacks — diasporas of the unwanted

 

When I was a little girl, people would ask, “What nationality are you?” That is to say, to what tribe do I belong? What is my country of origin? Belonging is tribe, blood and culture, not necessarily territory and certainly not based on citizenship now that so many in the world occupy diasporas and are not living in the place where their forbears were born. “Most of culture lies hidden, outside volume control, making up warp and woof of human existence,” says Edward T. Hall. It is human nature to want to belong. Continue Reading →

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Short films’ premiere celebrates voting power of communities of color

 

By Vickie Evans-Nash

Editor-in-Chief

 

On Thursday, October 11, between 6:30 and 8:30 pm, the Parkway Theater in Minneapolis will host a unique red-carpet event. Guests will be greeted at the door, and as they arrive their entrance will be streamed live on the theater screen. Entertainment will include local performers, and community members will introduce a series of recently released YouTube videos. This is not a Twin-Cities-turns-Hollywood event; it is rather a kickoff event highlighting the importance of participating in the political process through casting a vote.  
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Phillips scholars create summer programs for youth, families

 

Jazmine Darden designed a summer program to encourage urban students, including many students of color, to learn more about opportunities in the STEM fields, specifically engineering. Through “Bridgin’ the Gap,” students in kindergarten through eighth grade discovered new information about structural engineering through bridge-building activities. Darden, who is from Brooklyn Park and attends Augsburg College, is one of six Minnesota Private College students chosen to complete a community outreach project as a part of the Phillips Scholars Program. The Phillips Scholars Program is a competitive scholarship initiative that asks college students to propose and then implement a service project to meet an unmet community need. The funds available to selected students total $16,500 in the form of scholarships and stipends from the Jay and Rose Phillips Foundation. Continue Reading →

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On crime, racism, and distrust of police

 

“When you shoot somebody, that’s not the only person that you’re killing.”  

— Nona Gaye, Marvin Gaye’s daughter, testifying after his death

 

I attended a neighborhood meeting on racism. Afterward I mentioned the comments I heard in that meeting regarding law enforcement to one of our law enforcement officials. “It’s hopeless,” he said when I conveyed the negative comments from the seminar, “when that’s how they feel about us.”

So I stepped out from behind his hopelessness and asked to meet with another public relations representative from the local police department to see what could be and/or what is being done about this impasse between the electorate and their peace officers. Broad publicity has been given to the cases of O. J. Simpson, Rodney King, and Henry Louis Gates (and his meeting with President Obama) when each of these celebrities of color had run-ins with the law. Another famed activist, Angela Davis, is a proponent for the rights of inmates and speaks out on prisons as factories that house an inordinate number of young Black men compared to their ratio in the American population. Continue Reading →

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