Recent Articles

Finding home for the holidays

The Christmas season is a difficult time of year for me. I am always bothered by our culture’s egregious forms of commercialism, and its either lack of or anemic recognition of other forms for holidays like Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Ramadan, and the celebration of the winter solstice during this season. Over the years, as I learned how other cultures celebrated their various forms of religious expression during this time of year, as well as learned that the underlying message of Jesus was the embrace and celebration of human difference and diversity, the less and less I have come to like this holiday season. Too often we see the glitz and glamour that this holiday brings, and we have totally missed its spiritual message. I truly believe if American Christians stayed more focused on the message and teachings of Jesus, many lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people would not have the annual angst of searching for home for the holidays. Continue Reading →

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The Boy Scouts of America: another closed door for Black GBTQ youth



The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) and the Black Church are rightly lauded for molding young Black men into adult leaders. BSA troops have produced distinguished African American scouts like retired four-star general Colin Powell, six-time NBA champion Michael Jordan, and Heisman Trophy winner Herschel Walker. African American participation in the Boy Scout movement dates back to 1911, and its impact has not only forced the integration of young Black males into the organization, but also continues to address many of the challenges these young males confront today. With young African American males — particularly those in urban enclaves — at much higher risks for incarceration, gang violence, unemployment, fatherlessness, and substance abuse, the BSA has been a source of constant and consistent strong positive male figures for these young Black boys. Like many BSA troops, African American troops are often strongly affiliated with community Black churches. Continue Reading →

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Malawi LGBTQs’ short-lived freedom


I’d like to believe that Malawi’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) citizens and tourists had a few days to breathe easier. On November 5, the government issued a moratorium suspending all laws decriminalizing homosexuality. Three days later, on November 8, homosexuality was illegal again. Had the moratorium held, Malawi’s LGBTQ citizens, who constantly walk in fear and have increasingly been singled out, could not be arrested by police or be reported as engaging in same-gender consensual activity. Tourists would also be protected from arrest. Continue Reading →

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Five million people of color made voting history in 2008

Will voting trend continue in 2012? By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer


According to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) approximately five million more voters, including Blacks, Latinos and Asians, went to the polls in the historic 2008 presidential election in which America’s first Black president was elected. However, with the rise in voter suppression laws across the country since 2008, approximately five million voters are expected to be affected, says the ACLU. This includes Blacks and other people of color, the elderly, students, the poor and the disabled. “I don’t think it was any accident that after 2008 we found these huge gains in Blacks and Latinos in voting, as well as Asian Americans and Native Americans voting, then all of a sudden all these Republican-held [state] legislatures decided that voter fraud is a problem,” notes University of Minnesota Journalism Professor Catherine Squires. Continue Reading →

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