Jessica Wright

Recent Articles

‘What is your fourth of July to me?’

Frederick Douglass, July 5, 1852

Oration delivered in Corinthian Hall

 

Fellow citizens: Pardon me, and allow me to ask why am I called upon to speak here today? What have I or those I represent to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? And am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national alter and to confess the benefits and express devout gratitude for the blessings resulting from your independence to us? What to an American slave is your Fourth of July? Continue Reading →

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The Constitution contains roadmap to Black prosperity

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Jessica Wright

Guest Commentator

 

When the United States Constitution was created, it was an instrument that was not enacted to advance people of color. People of color were never meant to benefit from the Constitution. We were thought to be too ignorant to interpret the meanings of the Bill of Rights and the amendments. I have been studying the United States Constitution for over a year and it is my own opinion that our prosperity lies within the bounds of the Constitution. If the Constitution were in fact studied, poured over and well thought and applied to the many struggles we face and have always faced — such as racism, discrimination, inequality and segregation — w could change all of these circumstances significantly and flourish. Continue Reading →

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More support is needed for those considering suicide

By Jessica Wright

Guest Commentator

During the winter holidays suicide is more prevalent than at any other time of the year. I would like to expand on the topic of suicide because it is taboo, rarely discussed and is treated as a dirty word such as incest or rape. The suicide rate among people of color is higher than any other race, with Afro Americans and young adult male suicides being higher than any other age group. In my life I have had the grave misfortune to experience two suicides of people who were very close to me. I have also experienced a near fatal attempted suicide of a significant other, all African American men under 45 years of age. Continue Reading →

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The Black codes: framework for today’s laws

By Jessica Wright

Guest Commentator

 

Conclusion of a two-part editorial

 

In this succinct article I will embosom the semantics of the black code in the 21st century we continue to adhere to, the flagrant rules and regulations that recur in an attempt to further attenuate Blacks. [From part-one, published in last week’s issue]

Black children who were orphaned or their parents were destitute were handed over to the state, who in turn handed these children over to plantation owners. This is now called child protection. The black codes did nothing more than give free Blacks the opportunity to become slaves under contract, which were illegal to break. The only alternative was imprisonment and then being retired to their former plantation with a sentence of hard labor. Continue Reading →

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The Black codes: framework for today’s laws

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Jessica Wright

Guest Commentator

In 1777, slavery was abolished and with that the slavery codes became stagnant. Slave owners who fought against the abolition of slavery were athirst for a turnabout against the new law. The general assembly of several states inducted the black codes in an attempt to perpetuate their perfidy. Eventually the slave codes were transposed into black codes under the guise of equality. In this succinct article I will embosom the semantics of the black code in the 21st century we continue to adhere to, the flagrant rules and regulations that recur in an attempt to further attenuate Blacks. Continue Reading →

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Blacks need to realize the dream of unity

 

 

 

 

By Jessica Wright

Contributing Writer

 

Martin Luther King Jr., the Black Panther party, Emmett Till, Malcolm X, our very own Tycel Nelson and now Trayvon Martin. All of these African American men, along with women, have been racially profiled, beaten and or/shot and killed because of the color of their skin as well as the position they held in the African American community. They called us together for unity, racial equality and change. It is now 2013 and African Americans still have not found solace in America. African Americans are displaced and have no home to go “back” to. Continue Reading →

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Individual Education Plans left my children isolated, unchallenged

 

 

By Jessica Wright

Guest Commentator

 

I would like to warn parents about the disadvantages of an IEP or Individual Education Plan. My children were educated in the Minnesota Public and Charter School systems. Three of my four sons were placed in IEPs in kindergarten, and in two cases they remained there until high school. Normally, an Individual Education Plan is developed for children with learning disabilities. Over the years, I have witnessed IEPs being used as a “tool” to control children and contain them in classrooms that grow smaller as the level rises. Level 1 is mainstream; this is where there is no IEP required. Continue Reading →

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Child protection laws should better protect parents and children

For the last decade, I have watched the erosion within the judicial system concerning Children and Family Services’ child protection department. With few options, low budgets and stringent timeline laws, more single mothers and families are being required to sign over custody of their children or suffer the consequences. The purpose of child protection was initially meant to protect at-risk children, removing them in only the worst-case scenario, offering services to rectify whatever problems and address challenges needed to be met, with reunification being the end result.

In the last 10 years, new laws were enacted to limit time for reunification to six months for newborns and toddlers, and one year for all other children under the age of 18. This would seem a considerable amount of time for anyone who has not experienced the wrath of the child protection system, with its sometimes unrelenting hold over one’s life with guardians ad litem, who speak for the children and are unpaid volunteers. In fact, more and more women are being required to turn their children over as a ward of the state if there is no family to take the children. Continue Reading →

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