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Recent Articles

Honoring Emil Kapaun should reflect his commitment to nonviolent

 

 

Obama presented the nephew of the Rev. Emil Kapaun with the Medal of Honor, the highest military award for bravery. Rev. Kapaun died at the age of 35 in 1951, after spending six months in captivity during the Korean War. President Obama said, “This is the valor we honor today — an American soldier who didn’t fire a gun, but who wielded the mightiest weapon of all, a love for his brothers so pure that he was willing to die so that they might live.”

Is Obama talking about Kapaun’s love for his brothers on the North Korean team that was shooting at U.S. soldiers? Because that is what Kapaun was about; he loved and saw all men as his brothers, and that is why he would not pick up a gun. What Kapaun did is up there with Martin Luther King, Jr. and Henry David Thoreau, the great writer who refused to pay his taxes because of U.S. military violence and went to jail for it. Continue Reading →

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Critics of Rosenbloom column skirt around statements by Sanger

 

 

Columnist Lucky Rosenbloom’s commentary [column of April 11] on abortion and its devastating effects on Black America is the dirty little secret Black activists, most Black clergy, Black scholars and, of course, the liberal White left are silent about. There’s no virtue in supporting abortions, just what is vile to the human race, regardless of its legal status in America and numerous other progressive nations. Furthermore, the vast majority of abortions in the U.S. are for “convenience” or a way of contraception. Abortions on Black women per year (about 40 percent of the total abortions) exceed all other Black deaths (murders, AIDS, heart attacks, cancers, strokes and accidents) combined. I’m amused, if not unimpressed, at Susan A. Cohen’s and Oliver Steinberg’s statements [letters to the editor, MSR, April 25] defending Planned Parenthood and the anti-Black Margaret Sanger of yesteryear. Continue Reading →

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Black suspensions more than double other students’ in suburban schools

 

 
Hopkins students feel disrespected by school officials
 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

 

On April 26, Black Hopkins high school students walked out during the school’s last hour of the day. They complained of unfair treatment when it comes to disciplinary issues. “We want equality. We are here for an education,” says Junior Malika Musa, who co-organized the protest with fellow 11th-grader Maray Singleton. “[School officials] are not really trying to acknowledge that we have these problems and that we need to change,” adds Singleton. Continue Reading →

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The Good Wife Works – On Whitney Young: our Minnesota national treasure

 

 

We must deal with ourselves, but you must deal with us, too.”  — Eugene Robinson, Washington Post Pulitzer Prize winner

 

Seeing The Powerbroker: Whitney Young’s fight for civil rights, a documentary film by Bonnie Boswell, prompted me to go back to read a second book on Young, Whitney Young: Militant Mediator, by his official biographer Dennis Dickerson. Whitney Moore Young was born 7/31/21 in Kentucky and drowned in Nigeria 3/11/71. Ramsey Clark saw Young’s arm go up twice in the water that day as if in trouble and pulled him out. The two autopsies that were performed disagreed on the cause of Young’s death. As head of the National Urban League, “His organization effectively lobbied the House and Senate to pass the Civil Rights Act(s) of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.”

Young worked with President(s) John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Baines Johnson. Continue Reading →

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Undisputed champion Floyd Mayweather, Jr. now 44-0

 

 

LAS VEGAS — You might say that Floyd Mayweather, Jr. is in a league of his own. After spending over two months in jail and not stepping into the ring for almost two years, the new welterweight champion of the world proved again he’s the right stuff. The MGM Grand in Las Vegas is where father and son reunited for a common cause. Mayweather dominated challenger Robert (The Ghost) Guerrero, winning 11 of 12 rounds to capture the Welterweight World Championship before almost 16,000 fans on May Day. Former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson at one time was every bit as dominant — when he stepped into the ring he brought fear. Continue Reading →

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Terror in Boston? Terror in America!

How fragile is our precarious democracy in the face of senseless violence? Two explosions exposed the fragile state of our precarious social contract at the Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013, as three were killed and 175 or so injured, some badly, some losing arms and legs. As this column was written nine hours after the carnage (and published 8 days later), we don’t know yet if this was by domestic or foreign terrorists. Doesn’t matter. It was mean-spirited premeditation with malice aforethought, killing innocents to get attention and send a message. Continue Reading →

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Prominent Blacks have supported Planned Parenthood’s mission

The Spokesman-Recorder published an editorial by Lucky Rosenbloom [column of April 11] asking readers to ignore his political party’s voter-suppression efforts and direct our indignation and protest against legalized abortion instead. Readers must draw their own conclusions on the merits of that argument. But it should be noted that Mr. Rosenbloom’s article included false statements about, and fictitious quotations attributed to, Mrs. Margaret Sanger. The fact is that Mrs. Sanger and Planned Parenthood Federation worked together with dozens of prominent African American personages, including Dr. W.E.B. DuBois, Rev. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, Mrs. Mary Church Terrell, AME Bishop David Sims, and Meharry’s Dr. Michael Bent. The truth can be learned at the website www.trustblackwomen.org, which also posts the thoughtful speech written by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and delivered by Mrs. Coretta Scott King in acceptance of the Margaret Sanger award in 1966. Continue Reading →

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KFAN post Henry Lake is now all white

Joni Mitchell once sang that you don’t know what you’ve had until it’s gone. “We’re glad to get him,” admits KCSP-AM Program Director John Hanson on Henry Lake, the new midday host at “610 Sports Radio” in Kansas City. Personally I am glad the most talented but underused staffer at KFAN has finally left the area’s longest sports yakker. Lake had never gotten the right exposure, once being second billed with someone named Sludge, doing Vikings and Gophers ‘fan whine’ post-game shows then finally a solo hosting a show in what the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once called, the most segregated hour in America, Sunday mornings at 11. Now the Minneapolis-born Lake had to take his talent on the road, and thank goodness right in the nick of time. Continue Reading →

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We did it again! — Ninth annual Carol Fitzgerald Fund announces grant winners

 

 

 

Ten years ago on April 10, 2003, we lost a great woman, Carol Fitzgerald. Thanks to great support from our community locally and nationally, we continue her work. With major spending cuts across the United States in funding the fight against HIV-AIDS and breast cancer and for urban education support, many voices are not being heard. Last Friday, April 12 at the Metropolitan Ballroom on a cold snowy evening in Golden Valley and Saturday, April 13 at Martin Luther King Park in Minneapolis, we carried on the mission to do our part with your continued help, through the Carol Fitzgerald Memorial Fund (CFMF). Big Sy Huff was master of ceremonies; Hall-of-Famer Cris Carter, my sons All-Pro Larry Fitzgerald, Jr. and Marcus Fitzgerald, and yours truly spoke passionately about the work of Carol Fitzgerald. Continue Reading →

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Where are our leaders? What are our core values?

 

 

By Marian Wright Edelman

Guest Commentator

 

It will not be sufficient for Morehouse College — for any college, for that matter — to produce clever graduates, men fluent in speech and able to argue their way through; but rather honest men, men who can be trusted in public and private, who are sensitive to the wrongs, the sufferings, and the injustices of society and who are willing to accept responsibility for correcting the ills. — Benjamin E. Mays, President, Morehouse College

 

Benjamin E. Mays, Morehouse College’s president from 1940-1967, said this about the kind of men and leaders he expected Morehouse to produce. As a student at neighboring Spelman College, I heard and saw President Mays often and had the privilege of singing in Morehouse’s Sunday morning chapel choir and hearing this great man’s wisdom. Of the six college presidents in the Atlanta University academic complex, Mays was the one students looked up to most. He inspired and taught us by example and stood by us when we challenged Atlanta’s Jim Crow laws in the sit-in movement to open up public accommodations to all citizens. Continue Reading →

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