Major League Baseball

Recent Articles

Safe streets promoted for White baseball

Selective reporting keeps the true level of violence concealed
 

George Orwell’s masterpiece 1984 helps us understand Minneapolis granting temporary “Big Brother” status to Major League Baseball for summer 2014’s All Star Game week:  “temporary…and related special event permits will not be approved or issued by the City of Minneapolis without the additional approval of Major League Baseball.” (Star Tribune, May 3, 2014)

Minneapolis granted temporary Big Brother status earlier for the Vikings stadium, although the Vikings didn’t ask for it as did MLB. We want safe streets for all neighborhoods, not just for downtown stadium and lake neighborhoods. We recognize we live in “1984” in government surveillance, manipulating and falsifying information for “the greater good,” and in newspapers re-writing history to match current party line: “selective reporting:”

• 18 straight days of shootings, few reported

• 18 homicides in Little Somalia over last three years, few reported. • Star Tribune reported May 6 two White girls stabbed May 5 and reported shooting in New Brighton

• 30 days earlier, three young African American females shot and wounded in North Minneapolis, yet unreported

When authorities announced on May 6 the arrest of three young African Americans for the April 12, 2014 shooting and paralyzing of a young African American near the All Star site, the Star Tribune finally reported the shooting. Again: selective reporting. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , ,

Honoring Jackie in 2014

Tuesday is Jackie Robinson Day in Major League Baseball. Every player on all 30 MLB clubs will wear the number 42 on their backs — the same number Robinson wore when he broke in with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1948; the same number every club permanently retired save for one day a year.  

“I’ve always known the significance of that number,” admits Minnesota Twins outfielder Aaron Hicks, the team’s only U.S.-born Black player, “definitely for me being a Black player.”

 

Hicks ranks Robinson in the same trailblazing light as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks. “They are heroes, and he is right up there with them,” believes the second-year centerfielder. “He was the guy who took a lot of crap and handled it the right way. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Major League Baseball on the lookout for Black talent

 

 

 

According to the latest data, 20 percent of Major League Baseball (MLB) Central Office executives are Blacks or people of color. Three of them recently were in town during the Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) World Series. Since 2008, Wendy Lewis has been the highest ranking Black female as senior vice president of Diversity and Strategic Alliances. Thomas Brasuell is vice president of MLB Community Affairs. David James became the first full-time director of the 22-year-old RBI youth baseball and softball program in 2008. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

All-Star hype offers little for Blacks

 

 

The Minnesota Twins last week kicked off the team’s apparent year-long promotional blitz on their hosting of the 2014 All-Star Game. It is their third time being hosts at three different venues: the old and gone Metropolitan Stadium (1965); the old and soon-to-be gone Metrodome (1985); and, a year from now, at their present edifice located on the North Minneapolis-downtown border. “We dreamed of hosting this incredible event,” said Twins Owner Jim Polhad in a team release. After reading this and the media-distributed fact sheet, my curiosity got the best of me and I came up with some Roberta Flack-Donny Hathaway-Billy Preston-type questions:

Where were the Blacks then, and will there be any Blacks next year? Willie Mays and Bob Gibson were among 12 Blacks who played here in the 1965 game, and seven Blacks played in the 1985 dome game. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Again, the Twins are not getting it done

 

 

We have reached the All-Star Break in the Major League Baseball season, and usually the All-Star Game is about recognizing the great individual achievements of the many star players. Although there are many such individual achievements, I am going to focus on the teams.

Locally, the Twins continue to disappoint with a 39-53 record, 12 games back of Detroit in the American Central. The Twins are hoping to avoid losing 90 or more games for the third straight year. The Twins do have two All-Stars, catcher Joe Mauer hitting .320 and closer Glen Perkins with 21 saves, who have been outstanding. It’s been hit and miss for the most part over the last decade with the Twins, who have allowed so much talent to escape either by trades or bad decisions in free agency that it has to frustrate loyal, supportive fans. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

The ins and outs of player trades

 

 

The MSR is happy to introduce a new voice on our sports page, that of Julia Toles. Julia describes herself as “a writer, future producer, and driven young lady who is trying to be the voice of the unheard. I am a firm believer that so much can be learned through stories and listening. My passion for telling stories through the written word is what drives me daily. I hope that you enjoy the ride as I report the truth, delve into the ugly, and stay persistent in honesty!”

 
Introducing a new MSR sports columnist:
 
 

Welcome to the world of “Julia Says.”

 

Have you ever wondered why in the world of sports there is such a thing called trades? Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

42 shows Jackie Robinson as a flesh-and-blood hero

 

 

A movie review 

By Dwight Hobbes

Contributing Writer

 

Were baseball, back in 1947, the boring, high-priced waste of time and money it is today, you’d have to wonder why Jackie Robinson went to the trouble. In those days, though, it was an exciting sport to watch and, of course, to play. Athletes loved the game. They had to. Unlike today’s lackadaisical, overpaid prima donnas, even the stars of the sport then worked jobs in the off-season, selling furniture, pumping gas, farming, what have you. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Twins’ diversity talk seems mostly for show

 

 

 

A new movie on the life of Jackie Robinson premieres Friday. It has support from people in high places. “We think that everybody in this country needs to watch this movie,” advises First Lady Michelle Obama on the movie 42 after she and her husband, President Barack Obama viewed a private screening last week at the White House. The first of several Minnesota Twins “Diversity Days” will be Monday April 15, the day Major League Baseball (MLB) annually honors Robinson’s major league debut in 1947. “It was an important and powerful moment in baseball when Jackie Robinson broke in with the Brooklyn Dodgers,” recalls Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Let the games begin: the selection of stadium construction manager — Fraser, Davis and Tomlin: quota guys in the NFL?

 

The push-Black-Americans-in-football-to-the-back-of-the-bus games have begun, raising “Blacks need not apply” signs not only for stadium construction jobs but also NFL team head-coaching jobs. This is not about quotas. It is about statistical probabilities not being met due to intentional skewing out of contention a specific group of people. In this case, Black American workers, whether on stadiums or on stadium-field sidelines. On or about February 1, the Sports Facilities Authority will select a Vikings’ stadium construction manager. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

NFL ‘final four’: Not much has changed

 

We have gone from the New Orleans bounty gate to general managers, head coaches, coordinators, player suspensions, and a record number of players fined for hits with helmets leading to tragedies like players losing their lives. One Kansas City Chiefs player murdered the mother of his child, then took his own life. The very next weekend, a Dallas Cowboys player driving his car while drunk killed his passenger, teammate Jerry Brown, who was sober. Once the NFL regular season ended December 30 and the 12 qualifiers for the Super Bowl XL VII tournament were set, eight NFL head coaches were fired: Arizona, Buffalo, Cleveland, Chicago, Jacksonville, Philadelphia, San Diego and Kansas City. Also, five general managers were sent packing. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,