Malcolm X

Recent Articles

Don’t let the radicals say anything

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If there is a theme to the 50th year commemorative marches held in Washington DC and in cities all over the country last weekend, it had to be “don’t let the ‘real’” activists speak. I think the decision not to include people who shared Martin Luther King’s vision that this system that features the triplets of racism, materialism and militarism has to be changed, is indicative of just how far we have not come in 50 years. Of course the radicals ironically were not allowed to speak at the original march either. In fact, the entire thing was orchestrated from beginning to end. Malcolm X called them out at the time. Continue Reading →

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Blacks need to realize the dream of unity

 

 

 

 

By Jessica Wright

Contributing Writer

 

Martin Luther King Jr., the Black Panther party, Emmett Till, Malcolm X, our very own Tycel Nelson and now Trayvon Martin. All of these African American men, along with women, have been racially profiled, beaten and or/shot and killed because of the color of their skin as well as the position they held in the African American community. They called us together for unity, racial equality and change. It is now 2013 and African Americans still have not found solace in America. African Americans are displaced and have no home to go “back” to. Continue Reading →

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March on Washington – 50 years later

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. set the stage for the environmental justice movement
 

I  was not alive August 28, 1963. The March on Washington was held 100 years after the Emancipation Proclamation and eight years to the date of the lynching of Emmett Till. Being inquisitive, I look for clues in history that might lead to our freedom from oppression. I often find myself looking through the words of Dr .Martin Luther King for inspiration. I admit that I often skip the “I Have a Dream” speech. Continue Reading →

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Sistah Owned Hauls: tresses and bling

 

 

Being on a natural hair journey has allowed many women to take an amazing path on their self-exploration process. We learn to uncover our inner creativity. It shows up in our desire and eagerness to be authentic.  

The use of being creative can also be a collaborative means of fostering unity, especially in the natural hair community. I ran across a “Canadian Curly” named Toni Daley. Continue Reading →

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Three jazz artists producing quality material

 

 

 

What does it mean to work with a high level of musicality? Three cutting-edge musicians with new albums out — veteran artists Nicholas Payton, Christian McBride, and rising star Gerald Clayton —certainly know the answer to that question. And for their enduring creative efforts, their passionate music is wooing the world. Trumpeter Payton, bassist McBride, and pianist Clayton, all composers and bandleaders in their own rights, as well as Grammy-winning and Grammy-nominated artists, also continue to capture the attention of critics the world over with some of the most accessible new music that I’ve heard this year, so far. They may not be appearing on bandstands with their own bands at our local jazz clubs in support of their albums anytime soon, but at least two of them are no strangers to the Jazz Showcase bandstand in Chicago. Continue Reading →

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The struggle continues — Obama is not proof of a post-racial society

 

 

When one compares the 1968 Kerner Commission Report, which chronicled the problems that Black folks were experiencing in just about every walk of life at the time, and the misery index for Black folks today, one finds that the lot of Black folks haven’t changed that much. In a word, we are still an oppressed nationality living in the United States. So it would appear that the struggle for justice and equality continues. Well, at least common sense would dictate that the struggle continues. If Black folks are still experiencing job discrimination and police brutality and an unjust justice system as evidenced by the disparity in sentencing, particularly in drug cases, then the struggle clearly continues. Continue Reading →

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Does Black love exist?

Welcome to Black History Month 2013. This is a month to enjoy and celebrate the legacy of our ancestors and encourage the development of future leaders. This is a time of not only celebration, but also a time to embrace the greatness of being Black. We as people have come a long way to get to the point in time where we are today. In the middle of February, there is also another celebration that we all celebrate. Continue Reading →

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Media justice activists develop racial equity pledge

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Nearly 50 persons attended “A Gathering for Media Justice” held last weekend at Hamline University for community members and local non-mainstream media representatives. Sponsored by Community Action Against Racism (CAAR), Main Street Project and KFAI-FM, the December 8 half-day “conversation-based” event discussed media justice issues with an emphasis on local mainstream media coverage of communities of color. “People came [to the Saturday event] because they have a real hunger to see things different,” said Main Street Project Community Organizer Danielle Mikali. “I think oftentimes we feel frustrated and we don’t know where to turn. “As a media justice organizer, but also as an African American woman and mother, too often I don’t necessary know where to look in terms of the really great independent media outlets that are sharing stories,” Mikali said of the various local media that were represented at last Saturday’s event: the Cities’ two Black newspapers, the Twin Cities Daily Planet “and even cable — there were some cable access show hosts that were here,” noted Mikali. Continue Reading →

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Ballot or the bullet — Black voting rights still challenged in 21st century

 

By Corey Yeager

Guest Commentator

 

On Election Day 2008, I went to my polling site to participate in the most historical election since the origin of this country. I recall the excitement that coursed through me as I made way to my local polling station. That morning, I had made the intentional decision to vote early before I headed to work. My reasoning for voting early that morning held deep meaning. I am an African American male licensed marriage and family therapist. Continue Reading →

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No to the Republicrats and Demicans — And no, I ain’t crazy

 

 

Malcolm X used to tell a story about how a field slave said, “Let’s run away from here,” but some of the content, satisfied and visionless house slaves responded, “Where can we find a better master [but master nevertheless] than this? Where can we find better clothes [second hand and tattered] than this? Where we gonna get better food [hog guts, scraps from the master’s table] than this? Where you going to go?”

The old field slave said, “I don’t know but anyplace is better than here.”

When talking about this year’s presidential election, I feel like that field slave who couldn’t quite articulate what freedom would exactly look like but knew that his current condition was unsatisfactory. Some folks have talked real bad to me when I have suggested that maybe, just maybe, we should try something new, since most folks have to admit that no real significant changes have been made by either Democratic or Republican administrations on behalf of us Black and poor folks over the last few decades. Continue Reading →

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