Medgar Evers

Recent Articles

The Good Wife Works – On race and culture

  “There are no ni**ers here. The people here, they still have their self-respect, their pride.” Richard Pryor (1940-2005) 

 

There is only the Human Race; there is no legitimacy to “race” based on adaptations of human hair and skin color to geography and climate. At a recent discussion in a Black student group at a local college the talk revolved around how our surface variations, even height and weight (too much? Not enough?) and dress, can and are unfairly used to judge our worth. Whether you’re a redhead in Iceland and hence the descendent of slaves, or a mestizo of mixed blood in South America, or the son of a U.S. soldier and a Vietnamese mother, or a Chechen despised by a Russian, or born to the lower caste in India, the distinguishing marks of your birth can be used against you. Continue Reading →

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“Ask What You Can Do For Your Country”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Marian Wright Edelman

Contributing Writer

 

“It should be clear by now that a nation can be no stronger abroad than she is at home. Only an America which practices what it preaches about equal rights and social justice will be respected by those whose choice affects our future. Only an America which has fully educated its citizens is fully capable of tackling the complex problems and perceiving the hidden dangers of the world in which we live.” — From the speech President John F. Kennedy planned to deliver on November 22, 1963.  

I was a brand new law school graduate in my first months of work with the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund in New York City on that fateful November day 50 years ago. I had begun the day visiting a young Black male death row client in a rural Georgia prison accused of killing a White farmer and had returned to Atlanta where I was sitting in a courthouse library researching how many Blacks and Whites had been executed in Georgia’s history. Continue Reading →

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Trayvon Martin is guilty… …of being a young, Black male in the wrong place at the wrong time

 

 

The headline in this column is not a mistake. Seventeen-year-old Trayvon Martin was guilty of being Black. All of us know of jokes about being arrested for driving while being Black. It was no joke for 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, killed for walking in the rain while Black, wearing a hoodie, looking “suspicious,” and walking close to the townhouses to protect himself against the elements in a neighborhood that feared young Black men due to recent burglaries by Black youth. Two men: both young, both male, both wanting respect, but only one with a gun. Continue Reading →

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Investigate the racial context behind Martin’s death

 

By Jesse Jackson

Guest Commentator

 

If Trayvon Martin were not a young Black male, he would be alive today. Despite the verdict, it’s clear that George Zimmerman would never have confronted a young White man wearing a hoodie. He would, at the very least, have listened to the cops and stayed back. Trayvon Martin is dead because Zimmerman believed that “these guys always get away” and chose not to wait for the police. Trayvon Martin’s death shatters the convenient myths that blind us to reality. Continue Reading →

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Snowden, Hastings and surveillance? Were they right?

 
The ‘here we go again’  relevance for Black America
 

Young journalists stepped forward to warn again how we continue to lose our government to growing “Big Brother.” Thirty-year-old document leaker Edward J. Snowden has fled to a secret place. And 33-year-old journalist Michael Hastings was killed in a fiery auto crash in Los Angeles June 18, 2013. They have shocked the nation by exposing the extent of the secret crypt of America’s intelligence network’s surveillance abuse of American citizens. Black America is not shocked. It’s been part and parcel of our lives ever since the first Black foot stepped off the boat in Virginia, on through failed Reconstruction, Jim Crow, the 1920’s, on through to today, blocking our access and freedoms.

We especially remember the surveillance of Martin Luther King, Jr. and other civil rights leaders. Continue Reading →

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Where are our leaders? What are our core values?

 

 

By Marian Wright Edelman

Guest Commentator

 

It will not be sufficient for Morehouse College — for any college, for that matter — to produce clever graduates, men fluent in speech and able to argue their way through; but rather honest men, men who can be trusted in public and private, who are sensitive to the wrongs, the sufferings, and the injustices of society and who are willing to accept responsibility for correcting the ills. — Benjamin E. Mays, President, Morehouse College

 

Benjamin E. Mays, Morehouse College’s president from 1940-1967, said this about the kind of men and leaders he expected Morehouse to produce. As a student at neighboring Spelman College, I heard and saw President Mays often and had the privilege of singing in Morehouse’s Sunday morning chapel choir and hearing this great man’s wisdom. Of the six college presidents in the Atlanta University academic complex, Mays was the one students looked up to most. He inspired and taught us by example and stood by us when we challenged Atlanta’s Jim Crow laws in the sit-in movement to open up public accommodations to all citizens. Continue Reading →

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Does Black love exist?

Welcome to Black History Month 2013. This is a month to enjoy and celebrate the legacy of our ancestors and encourage the development of future leaders. This is a time of not only celebration, but also a time to embrace the greatness of being Black. We as people have come a long way to get to the point in time where we are today. In the middle of February, there is also another celebration that we all celebrate. Continue Reading →

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The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975: Documentary recalls era of radical struggle

 

 

A film review

By Brittany Lewis

Contributing Writer

 

On Friday, February 24, the group Solidarity will host a free screening of the film The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 at the Capri Theater in North Minneapolis. The social hour begins at 6 pm with the film showing at 7 pm. This is a free event. Presented as a group of Swedish filmmakers’ — as “outsiders” — observation of America from 1967-1975, this film tells a more nuanced story of Black radical struggle in the United States. Although this film does not aim to provide its viewers with a comprehensive history of the rise of the Black Power Movement, it does highlight the growing divide between two Americas — Black and White. Continue Reading →

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