Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder

Recent Articles

Two Washburn grads who chose to stay home

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When he graduated from Minneapolis Washburn five years ago, RA’SHADE HAGEMAN was the state’s top football prospect and among the nation’s top tight ends. When he entered the University of Minnesota in the fall of 2009, standing at 6’-8”, he had helped the Millers’ boys’ basketball team capture the Class 3A state championship five months earlier. After switching to defensive end and adjusting to the rigor of Division I football and college academics, Hageman developed into one of the country’s top players. He earned All-Big Ten honors and is among the top 25 2014 NFL draft prospects. As a high school senior, Hageman was recruited by a host of Division I schools before choosing to stay home and play for the Gophers. Continue Reading →

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For these athletes, ‘being Black while swimming’ is no joke

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

There are approximately 100 African American and other student-athletes of color this school year at the University of Minnesota. In an occasional series throughout the 2013-14 school and sports year, the MSR will highlight these players. This week: U of M swimmers Emanuel “Manny” Pollard and Daryl Turner

 

Manny Pollard and Daryl Turner, the Gophers’ only Black members on the swimming and diving teams, have provided color to a historically vanilla sport. Pollard believes he, Turner, and a Black diver at Ohio State were the only ones of color in the Big Ten. “There aren’t that many of us throughout the country,” Pollard says. Continue Reading →

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Online network will ease access to after-school programs in Mpls

Fatima Muhammad hired to head project
 
The Minneapolis Youth Coordinating Board (YCB) has announced that it is developing an online network aimed at linking parents, caregivers and young people to after-school programs available throughout Minneapolis. The YCB has hired Fatima Muhammad as after-school project director to help manage development of this citywide network. Modeled after initiatives like Saint Paul’s Sprockets, the network will be designed to help create awareness of and enhance opportunities for young people to benefit from the vast array of after-school programs offered, from sports and arts programming to leadership-building, service-learning and other opportunities. “Participating in after-school programs strengthens young people’s ability to complete school, helps them develop essential skills and talents, and contributes to advanced learning, career preparation and future civic engagement,” said YCB’s Executive Director Ann DeGroot. “We want all Minneapolis young people to have access to safe, quality opportunities to learn outside the classroom. This coordinated approach, which Fatima will help manage, is a big step in making that happen.”

Besides benefiting young people, their families and the community, the citywide system is expected to enhance coordination and communication among youth-serving organizations, facilitate the use of data to inform planning for after-school programs, and optimize the resources of the parks, schools, libraries, community partners and families. Continue Reading →

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State of hockey? Caution!

Recently the University of Connecticut captured both the Men’ and Women’s NCAA Basketball National Championships. It’d only been done twice, and both times the Huskies have done it. Two weeks later, Minnesota had a great opportunity to match the achievement. The Women Gophers in hockey were the defending undefeated national champions. While the men’s hockey team has been rated number one all year, the double championship was again in Minnesota’s grasp. Continue Reading →

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Help! We need family therapy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a mental health professional and someone who has deep concern for Black people and our future, I cannot stress the importance of family. The family unit is the foundation for your future. Whenever an element of trauma and/or abuse is introduced into the family structure, the foundation become fragile. When trauma and or abuse is introduced into the family structure, the family fabric begins to wear and ultimately will tear. If we are to be honest about the state of Black families, we can say that a significant number of our families are in despair. Continue Reading →

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It’s hard being a Black coach — and harder yet as a Black female coach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First of two parts
 
The firing drum that has slowly banged for Mike Woodson since mid-winter reached its crescendo Monday when he was fired as New York Knicks head coach. The final drumbeat came last week when Woodson wasn’t involved in the usual coach-conducted players’ exit interviews. We are midway through the 21st century’s second decade, and we still only use one hand to count the number of Black coaches in any one of the five major leagues: four Black NBA coaches, two males and a female in the WNBA, three Black MLB managers, four NFL coaches. We’re still waiting for a Black coach in the National Hockey League. One-hand counting is still used in college basketball and football at all three NCAA divisions as well. Continue Reading →

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I remember when the community supported us

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Lovell Oates
Contributing Writer

 

Second in a series
 
Last week: I remember these things because the times were very different in these institutions when the community would stop by and check on us. Those memories were from around 12 years ago, that’s about how long it’s been since I have seen people from my community come in and give the pure unadulterated truth.  

I know some people will read this and are like, ”Hell no! I helped Joe the first five times he got out of jail, then, he went next door and stole Mrs. Johnson’s TV.” We must understand these are no strange happenings. It is by design that Joe and other clowns like him are released on the community continuously. Continue Reading →

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Condoleezza Rice: war criminal, race hustler

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are a myriad of reasons why Condoleezza Rice was a bad choice to speak at the University of Minnesota on Keeping Faith with a Legacy of Justice: the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. The first is that it is downright hypocritical. Rice is not an expert on Civil Rights. In fact, her life and her career are all a reflection of her disdain for civil rights. Neither Rice nor her family believed in the efficacy of the struggle for the rights of Black people to be free of Jim Crow racism in the United States. Continue Reading →

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The continuing battle of Sgt. Michael Keefe

And the disappearance of  Black police officers from the MPD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See my August 29, 2007 column regarding the courageous battle waged by Lt. Michael Keefe of the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD), “A profile in courage and integrity — the saga of Lt. Michael Keefe” (link below). Keefe was demoted to sergeant as part of a mean-spirited vendetta against this White officer and against some African American police officers. The August 2007 column provides insight into the latest battles currently being fought within the city and within its police department. And even though Mayor Betsy Hodges and city council members have said they are committed to equity and fairness in the governance of the city of Minneapolis, a couple of major battles centering around equity in the MPD questions their commitment. The first deals with the attempt by the City of Minneapolis, in State District Court, to avoid releasing information from the now six-and-a-half year lawsuit battle brought by then Lt. and now Sgt. Continue Reading →

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Some class sizes reduced in new St. Paul teachers’ contract

Trust an ongoing issue between teachers, district
 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

 

The St. Paul Federation of Teachers (SPFT) and St. Paul Public Schools (SPPS) both cite “seven community-developed priorities” in the three-year “landmark contract” that was settled last month and approved earlier this month. These priorities include smaller classes and hiring more teachers and staff. Two key persons directly involved in the negotiations, SPFT President Mary Cathryn Ricker and SPPS Chief of Staff Michelle Walker, last week spoke to the MSR in separate interviews. Continue Reading →

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