Recent Articles

Carew pushes for Oliva induction to Hall of Fame

Rod Carew is one of 66 living baseball Hall of Famers. He, among others, wants former Minnesota Twins teammate Tony Oliva to soon join this honored group. “Tony Oliva deserves to be in the Hall of Fame,” proclaimed Carew. He told the MSR during the recent MLB All-Star series of events that he plans to lobby for his teammate later this year as a member of the Golden Era Committee. “I’m going to push for it in the next round of voting.”

A three-time batting champion and five-time league leader in hits during the era of the pitcher in the 1960s; the only player in American League history to win batting titles in his first two pro seasons; a .304

career average; over 1,900 hits in his career — these are Hall-worthy numbers. Continue Reading →

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Annual reporting on Twins’ lack of diversity grows tiresome

I’ve held off long enough, but it’s that time again to write about the results of Dr. Richard Lapchick’s annual report cards on the pro leagues’ diversity efforts. The other print media use the fewest possible words to mention these Racial and Gender Report Cards (RGRC) on their sports pages because it doesn’t matter to them if diversity is achieved or not, especially when their own workplaces aren’t that diverse. It’s not like I don’t want to, but annual reporting on the snail-like progress the local pro teams have made on diversity over the years hasn’t much changed. In the Twin Cities, the diversity axiom isn’t how some things change and some remain the same, but rather nothing changes but the year. It’s like the teacher who practices social promotion every year — although the student doesn’t deserve it, they have another class coming in. Continue Reading →

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Safe streets promoted for White baseball

Selective reporting keeps the true level of violence concealed

George Orwell’s masterpiece 1984 helps us understand Minneapolis granting temporary “Big Brother” status to Major League Baseball for summer 2014’s All Star Game week:  “temporary…and related special event permits will not be approved or issued by the City of Minneapolis without the additional approval of Major League Baseball.” (Star Tribune, May 3, 2014)

Minneapolis granted temporary Big Brother status earlier for the Vikings stadium, although the Vikings didn’t ask for it as did MLB. We want safe streets for all neighborhoods, not just for downtown stadium and lake neighborhoods. We recognize we live in “1984” in government surveillance, manipulating and falsifying information for “the greater good,” and in newspapers re-writing history to match current party line: “selective reporting:”

• 18 straight days of shootings, few reported

• 18 homicides in Little Somalia over last three years, few reported. • Star Tribune reported May 6 two White girls stabbed May 5 and reported shooting in New Brighton

• 30 days earlier, three young African American females shot and wounded in North Minneapolis, yet unreported

When authorities announced on May 6 the arrest of three young African Americans for the April 12, 2014 shooting and paralyzing of a young African American near the All Star site, the Star Tribune finally reported the shooting. Again: selective reporting. Continue Reading →

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Honoring Jackie in 2014

Tuesday is Jackie Robinson Day in Major League Baseball. Every player on all 30 MLB clubs will wear the number 42 on their backs — the same number Robinson wore when he broke in with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1948; the same number every club permanently retired save for one day a year.  

“I’ve always known the significance of that number,” admits Minnesota Twins outfielder Aaron Hicks, the team’s only U.S.-born Black player, “definitely for me being a Black player.”


Hicks ranks Robinson in the same trailblazing light as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks. “They are heroes, and he is right up there with them,” believes the second-year centerfielder. “He was the guy who took a lot of crap and handled it the right way. Continue Reading →

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Nielsen report reveals racial divide in sports media viewership

Blacks, Latinos and Asians on average spent more time visiting sports sites on the computer and watching sports videos on the computer last year than the U.S. average, says a new Nielsen report. Nielsen’s 2013 Year in Sports Media Report found that “television is not the only medium where sports consumption is on the rise. The average amount of time spent visiting sports sites and accessing sports content on mobile phones in April 2013 increased by double digits compared to 2012.”

It also showed a 10-year growth in sports programming from 35 billion available hours in 2003 to over 116 billion in 2013. Sports consumption by Blacks, Latinos and Asians, however, fluctuated last year in the following three categories examined last year, according to the Nielsen report.  

Visiting sports sites on a computer (hours:minutes)

• April 2013: U.S. (1:25); Blacks (2:12); Asians (1:47); Whites (1:19); Latinos (1:02)

• September 2013: U.S. (1:45); Asians (1:56); Whites (1:47); Blacks (1:45); Latinos (1:17)


Watching video on a sports site on a computer

• April 2013: U.S. (35 mins.); Blacks (46 mins.); Asians (43 mins.); Latinos (36 mins.)

• September 2013: U.S. (36 mins.); Asians (1:05); Blacks (47 mins.); Whites (33 mins.); Latinos (30 mins.)


Accessing sports content on a smart phone

April 2013: U.S. (1:08); Latinos (1:31); Whites (1:10); Asians (1:00); Blacks (44 mins.)

September 2013: U.S. (1:32); Latinos (1:45); Asians (1:42); Whites (1:35); Blacks (1:15)


Watching sports on TV

The Nielsen report also broke down fan viewing demographics by race/ethnicity. Continue Reading →

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State bill aims for athletic concussion protection, prevention

Law would set standards for head injury care, education for student-athletes and those who work with them

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

(Originally published May 5, 2011 in the MSR)

A bill that would establish education and return-to-play standards for youth athletes following a concussion currently is moving through the Minnesota Legislature. Five states this year already passed such laws: South Dakota, Iowa, Wyoming, Colorado

and Utah. Bill supporters are optimistic that it will be passed before this year’s session concludes in May. A concussion is a type of brain injury that changes the way the brain normally works. It is caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head, and can also occur from a blow to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. Continue Reading →

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Major League Baseball on the lookout for Black talent




According to the latest data, 20 percent of Major League Baseball (MLB) Central Office executives are Blacks or people of color. Three of them recently were in town during the Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities (RBI) World Series. Since 2008, Wendy Lewis has been the highest ranking Black female as senior vice president of Diversity and Strategic Alliances. Thomas Brasuell is vice president of MLB Community Affairs. David James became the first full-time director of the 22-year-old RBI youth baseball and softball program in 2008. Continue Reading →

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No Major for Tiger, no win for Vikings, no hope for Twins



Where do I go? The Majors golf season is over for another year, and no Major for Tiger. The Vikings lose 27-13 in their first pre-season game at home to Houston. The Twins are going nowhere, drifting through another losing season. Paula Deen’s favorite football player is Riley Cooper , wide receiver of the Philadelphia Eagles. Continue Reading →

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