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Treating skin of color

Conclusion of a 4-part column

 

 

Most skin diseases occur in people of all nationalities, regardless of their skin color. Certain problems encountered in the skin are more common in people with different hues of skin, and sometimes a disorder seems more prominent because it affects skin color. This week concludes our review of these disorders and their treatments.  

 

Tinea capitis

Tinea capitis, also known as ringworm, is endemic in African American children. Any child with a scaling, itching scalp should be thoroughly investigated for tinea capitis. Continue Reading →

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More surprising pregnancy facts: body changes beyond your tummy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion  of a two-part column

 
Last week’s column described some changes during pregnancy besides your growing abdomen — and perhaps your breasts, too — that may take you by surprise. As with many pregnancy changes, hormones and genetics play a major role in most of these changes in your looks. Here are a few more such changes you may notice:
 

Skin discolorations 

Increased melanin can cause darks spots, especially on the cheeks, forehead, upper lip and arms. These pigment changes will become worse if you don’t protect yourself from the sun. The medical term for this discoloration is melasma. What to do: Protect your face by using a sunblock that offers both UVA and UVB protection with an SPF of 30 or higher, wearing a hat with a broad brim and sun-protective clothing (Coolibar Sun Protective Clothing). If melasma develops, there are several approaches to treating it including topical fade creams, skin peels and lasers. Continue Reading →

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