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Minnesota honors civil rights legend

 

 
Juanita Jackson Mitchell helped reestablish Twin Cities NAACP branches
 

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Juanita Jackson Mitchell (1913-1992) only lived in St. Paul for four years, but her impact during that stint laid an eventual path to many firsts in Minnesota. The Juanita Jackson Mitchell Crusader for Freedom Exhibit, a compilation of Mitchell’s personal photographs and other artifacts, was on display at the State Capitol May 8-14. It is a traveling exhibit on loan from Roland Park Country School in Baltimore, Maryland, where it was established in 1995, three years after her death in 1992 of heart failure at age 79. “This exhibit [is] about her life,” Minnesota State General Counsel Micah Hines told the MSR prior to the May 8 opening program and tour. Continue Reading →

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Affordable Care Act Updates — ‘Navigators’ to help spread the word on the state’s MNsure health exchange

 

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

“Under the Affordable Care Act, every plan in the marketplace has to cover a set of 10 essential benefits [such as] prescription drugs, lab services, hospitalization, emergency care, mental health care [and] maternity coverage,” said Families USA Health Policy Analyst Sarah Bagge during a March 22 webcast for reporters, including the MSR.

“There is no ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to applying” for health coverage, she added.  “People will have different preferences in terms of how they want to sign up for health coverage,” whether on line, in person or by phone. “We have to recognize that there are going to be a lot of consumers that are going to need help or have questions,” Bagge explained. The “consumer-friendly” application process as well as other pertinent information will be available in Spanish and other languages besides English, Bagge continued. “We want to make sure that it is as easy as possible, and help needs to be available at every step of the way.”

There are many people who are digitally connected, but to expect every consumer to apply for health coverage on line “is unreasonable,” believes Enroll America Best Practices Institute Director Jenny Sullivan. Her research found that buying health insurance on line “is taking it a step too far for most folk. Continue Reading →

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Salaried vs. hourly and why all pay is not equal

 

 

By Dedrick Muhammad

Guest Commentator

 

If unemployment rates fall to pre-recession levels, will our economy be as healthy as it was in 2006? Not necessarily, the research shows. Even as rising housing prices and falling unemployment rates show signs of an economic recovery, it’s important to note that the recession has permanently shifted our job market for the worse. A new study published by the National Employment Law Project shows that while the majority of jobs lost during the recession were in the middle-income range, the jobs that have since come to replace them are lower-paying hourly-wage positions. According to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), employees are generally divided into two categories: exempt and nonexempt. Continue Reading →

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Black in the USA

 
Sixteen year old Brooklyn youth shot and killed , protests held
Kimani Gray was shot and killed last week in Brooklyn, after being hit by 7 bullets fired by two plain clothes New York City police detectives. Autopsies so far revealed that 3 bullets entered the teen from the rear. According to police the teen pointed a pistol at two plainclothes officers. Commissioner Ray Kelly said the department has three “ear witnesses” who heard officers tell Gray to “freeze” and “don’t move” before firing 11 shots. However another eyewitness Tishana King interviewed in the New York Daily News who said she saw what happened from her window reported that she is “certain [Gray] didn’t have anything in his hands” when he was shot. Continue Reading →

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When will MN’s ‘no Black workers need apply’ policy end?

 
Who will monitor and enforce Black participation on the so-called ‘People’s Stadium’ project?  

 

My concern is for the ending of the discrimination patterns and practices that prevent access for Black men and women to the opportunities of Minnesota (education, jobs, housing), with discrimination led by White and Black elites (City agencies, nonprofits, foundations, churches, corporations, the NAACP, Urban League). My Solution Paper #46, on my website (www.TheMinneapolis Story.com) lists my columns providing details, enough to launch a dozen lawsuits. Minnesota’s discrimination molehills have been easy to sweep under the rug. But the discrimination mountain looming on the horizon, the billion-dollar stadium, will take the “easy” away. Continue Reading →

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Ruby! The Story of Ruby Bridges: Play about civil rights-era child hero re-created in new staging

 

 

It isn’t often a figure from African America history is still around once his or her accomplishments finally are celebrated. A spectacular exception, of course, is President Barack Obama. Not nearly as famous but nonetheless a hallmark is the triumph in 1960 of little six-year-old Ruby Bridges, documented as the first child of color to set foot in a segregated elementary school. She attended William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans and, in those days, it wasn’t a simple matter of being enrolled and showing up for the first day of class in a pretty dress with your pencils all nicely sharpened as you get ready to learn your reading, writing and arithmetic. White hatred of Black people was even worse than it is today and savagely overt in the South, such that this innocent’s mom and dad, Lucille and Abon Bridges were, by request of the NAACP, taking her life in their hands. Continue Reading →

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Emancipation Proclamation and our collective history

 

By Benjamin Todd Jealous

Guest Commentator

 

The Emancipation Proclamation, which set our nation on the path to the end of slavery, was signed 150 years ago this month. This year, we should resolve to teach our children the story of our collective history. The past century and a half offers countless tales of bravery and sacrifice to inspire the next generation. Only by sharing our history will we be able to continue our progress over the next 150 years. President Lincoln’s wartime proclamation in 1863 read that “all persons held as slaves” in rebel states “are, and henceforward shall be free.” This was a noble idea and certainly a brave gesture. Continue Reading →

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North Carolina NAACP statement on pardon of Wilmington 10

 

 

Today the spirit of justice was awakened in the capital of North Carolina. Governor Beverly Perdue signed a Pardon of Innocence for nine men and one woman known as The Wilmington 10. These young people were nonviolent protestors fighting for educational equality. They were framed, wrongfully convicted and incarcerated in connection to a fire bombing in Wilmington, NC over 40 years ago. These unjust convictions were due to racist manipulation of the court system and extraordinary and blatant racially motivated prosecutorial misconduct. Continue Reading →

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Letter to the Editor: Why is the superintendent of the MPS silent on segregation at Richard Green Central?

 

Segregation is happening right in our neighborhood at Richard Green Central Park School. This school is under scrutiny due to the segregation of African American and Latino students. Students are separated and placed into classrooms based upon their last names in order to determine if a student will be placed in a Spanish- or English-speaking class. Many parents, community members, educators, and students have voiced their concerns about the maltreatment of students, lack of concern for underrepresented populations and the segregation, which has created a hostile school environment. The Superintendent Bernadeia Johnson has been contacted numerous times about this matter, but she fails to respond and is not concerned with ensuring that the Minneapolis Public Schools are adhering to school laws. Continue Reading →

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‘No Black talent on the air’

White perspectives dominate local mainstream media
 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

Black voices are barely heard on local mainstream radio. It’s even worse in local sports radio. “There is no Black talent on the air in the Twin Cities except at KMOJ,” claims KTWN-FM’s Brandon Wright, a nine-year veteran. KFAN “is too White for me,” proclaims St. Paul African American Leadership Council’s Tyrone Terrill, speaking of the Clear Channel station that has only two Black on-air talents, Henry Lake and Trent Tucker, heard only on weekends, and none on weekdays. Continue Reading →

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