National Newspaper Publishers Association

Recent Articles

African American doctors on the front lines







By Michael A. LeNoir, M.D.

Guest Commentator


More than 15 years ago, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against the nation’s major cigarette manufacturers for their gross misrepresentation of the hazards of smoking to the general public. Finally, after years of wrangling and continued resistance, the Justice Department and the Tobacco-Free Kids Action Fund reached an agreement with the four major tobacco companies. Part of this settlement requires these tobacco companies to spend up to $45 million placing “apology” or “corrective” ads in the media; primarily with television and radio networks and stations, newspapers and magazines. This is a gesture meant to make amends for the countless millions of lives that have been either lost or harmed beyond repair due to the consumption of tobacco products. Still, nearly a half million people will die from smoking-related diseases just in this year alone. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Black Press still ‘delivering news for and about Blacks’

An interview with the national Black newspaper assn. board chair
By Kam Williams
Contributing Writer


Cloves C. Campbell, Jr., is publisher of the Arizona Informant, a family-owned and operated newspaper that provides an important voice for the African American community in Arizona. This year it celebrates 42 years of publishing. Currently, he serves as board chair of the National Newspaper Publishers’ Association (NNPA), “a 73-year-old federation of more than 200 Black community newspapers from across the United States,” according to their website ( ).  

As a Phoenix native, Campbell’s personal commitment and knowledge of the community in which he grew up shows throughout his work. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

North Carolina NAACP statement on pardon of Wilmington 10



Today the spirit of justice was awakened in the capital of North Carolina. Governor Beverly Perdue signed a Pardon of Innocence for nine men and one woman known as The Wilmington 10. These young people were nonviolent protestors fighting for educational equality. They were framed, wrongfully convicted and incarcerated in connection to a fire bombing in Wilmington, NC over 40 years ago. These unjust convictions were due to racist manipulation of the court system and extraordinary and blatant racially motivated prosecutorial misconduct. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,