Native Americans

Recent Articles

The Good Wife Works – America in the Age of Obama

In a recent workshop held on the campus of Macalester College in St. Paul on the state and condition of America in the age of Obama, it was agreed that our president and the symbol that the presidency represents is its highest compliment, the ultimate achievement. He is credible. He qualifies to be president. Do the rest of us? Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Janis Lane-Ewart: Twin Cities’ only Black female station manager

KFAI expands audience though Somali-oriented programming, social media

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

Music always has been a part of Janis Lane-Ewart’s life; rhythm and blues was the norm in her home while growing up in Chicago. Although her aspirations initially were to pursue law, and Lane-Ewart studied political science in college, she eventually became an administrator for Chicago Music Collective. When Lane-Ewart relocated in 1989 to the Twin Cities, she worked with a local arts organization. But then the proverbial “phone” rang and her career changed directions. “The radio business called me,” she recalls of her first foray into radio when she became a volunteer at KFAI Radio to host a weekly jazz program. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Voting wrongs vs. voting Rights

By Brandon Hill

Guest Commentator

 

In the election of 1788, laws barred poor White men from voting. In the election of 1864, laws blocked former slaves from voting. In the election of 1912, laws barred White women from voting. In the election of 1920, laws barred Native Americans from voting. In the election of 1968, laws barred young people from voting. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Voter suppression laws cast chill on Black community

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Khalil Abdullah

Contributing Writer

 

As voter suppression laws continue to be debated in states across the country, members of the African American press and voting rights advocates say the repercussions of that debate are already being felt. The most immediate metric, they note, will be whether voter turnout is reduced. For some observers, that is a likely prospect. “Talking about the guys who are not going to vote, four years ago, they took chances,” said Harold Meeks, publisher of the Tell Us USA News Network, an online news magazine with bureaus in several cities. “I owe $23,000 in child support, but I’m going out to vote for the Black man,” Meeks said, describing a hypothetical Detroit voter in 2008. “They’re not going to take those same chances again, particularly with these other voices saying that we’re going to scrutinize you,” he continued. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Most ‘real Americans’ don’t vote on election day

 

 

I saw a yard sign in South Minneapolis. It said “Real Americans Vote.”

No, this is incorrect. Most real Americans do not vote. Most Native Americans stay home on Election Day, and they are the “real Americans.”

When I tell people that I have not voted in over five years, and that I’m proud of it, they are disgusted and shocked. But if I was not a middle-aged White guy, but a Native man, they of course would be much more respectful and understanding of my desire to not participate. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Black farmers fight to retain land ownership

 
Modern-day struggle renews, redefines 40-acers-and-a-mule promise
 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Land ownership, which signaled both privilege and power, was a European concept brought to the country. “The way we think about property is a European tradition,” notes Maria Wiseman, an assistant solicitor in the Division of Indian Affairs with the U.S. Interior Department. Wiseman and the University of Wisconsin’s Katrina Quisumbling King and Jess Gilbert last month discussed the significance of Black farmland ownership in the Rural South at the Black Environmental Thought II conference at the University of Minnesota. The “40 acres and a mule” promise was a result of Special Field Order No. 15 issued by General William T. Sherman in 1865 that was intended to make available “hundreds of thousands of acres of confiscated and abandoned Confederate lands to former slaves for settlement,” explained Wiseman. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Five million people of color made voting history in 2008

Will voting trend continue in 2012? By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

According to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) approximately five million more voters, including Blacks, Latinos and Asians, went to the polls in the historic 2008 presidential election in which America’s first Black president was elected. However, with the rise in voter suppression laws across the country since 2008, approximately five million voters are expected to be affected, says the ACLU. This includes Blacks and other people of color, the elderly, students, the poor and the disabled. “I don’t think it was any accident that after 2008 we found these huge gains in Blacks and Latinos in voting, as well as Asian Americans and Native Americans voting, then all of a sudden all these Republican-held [state] legislatures decided that voter fraud is a problem,” notes University of Minnesota Journalism Professor Catherine Squires. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,