NCAA

Recent Articles

‘Enormous’ graduation gap between Blacks and Whites in college hoops

 

In past years, I used to scrounge newsstands for any piece of needed information to fill out mimeographed bracket sheets, only to later lose my hard-earned money in the worksite pool. Don’t get me wrong — I still sequester myself watching the first two rounds through bloodshot eyes, with the mute button at full volume. However, I no longer act like Marvin Gaye, foolishly asking what’s going on, because I’m now like Johnny Nash and can see clearly now — my eyes are now wide open. While broadcasters and others call it the “Big Dance,” the annual NCAA men’s basketball tournament actually is like the players’ ball where the “pimps” — the television networks, the NCAA, advertisers and big-school officials — all get rich. An estimated $702 million in television revenues will be raked in, and with ticket sales, that amount is expected to balloon to around $797 million. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Why so little love for the NIT?

 

 

The National Invitational Tournament (NIT) and the Women’s National Invitation Tournament both offer “deserved opportunities” to men’s and women’s basketball programs that, for one reason or several others, don’t make the NCAAs. Yet, both by college basketball fans and snobbish media types, the two national tourneys that annually crown champions are treated like lepers. This is the 76th year for the men’s NIT. From 1938-1976, every tournament game was played at Madison Square Garden, which hosts both the tourney semifinals and finals. Its field has been as high as 40 teams but now stands at 32. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Finally, parity in men’s college hoops

 

 

 

Can we say with all surety that parity was finally achieved this year in men’s college basketball? KFAN’s Henry Lake (HL) and Robert Littal (RL) of BlackSportsOnline recently shared their thoughts on this and this year’s cliché-filled NCAA tournament already in progress. (Please note: Lake and Littal’s comments were made prior to Sunday’s tournament selections.)

View: Was there indeed parity this season? HL: There always will be premier schools, but what I think is different this year is that some of those teams that we always penciled in as top seeds in the tournament essentially have taken a step back, [and] other teams have taken a step forward. I am not surprised that there is parity. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Wild, wild NFL win and lose!

 

Give the NFL credit for being smart. Number one, all they do is win. Revenue-ratings, popularity, continued growth, and they do all this while assaulting the NFL Players Association. The recent flurry of activity in free agency is so deceiving. Like Mike Wallace leaves Pittsburgh and signs with Miami for $60 million, $30 million guaranteed. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Gophers WBB falls again

 

HOFFMAN ESTATES, ILL. — In a few days, Penn State and several other Big Ten women’s hoop squads will learn where their March playing schedule takes them next. But unlike the regular season champions, the Lady Lions, who are assured their spot, the Gophers aren’t sure of theirs. “We just let the basketball gods figure it out,” admitted U of M Coach Pam Borton last Thursday after her team’s nine-point loss to Ohio State in the Big Ten tourney’s first round as she referred to the NCAA selection committee. “It’s out of our hands,” added Ohio State senior guard Tayler Hill of her Buckeyes’ chances. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Latest report card on diversity in sports editing shows no improvement

 

 

Dr. Richard Lapchick called his first sports editors report card on racial hiring in 2006 “most discouraging.” His latest report, released March 1, hasn’t changed. The 2012 Associated Press Sports Editors (APSE) Racial and Gender Report Card, published by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) gave an overall C+ grade for racial hiring practices at APSE member newspapers and websites. It was the same grade awarded two years ago. However, the report shows that actually the number of Black male and females at all four circulation-size (A, B, C, D) newspapers have barely changed since 2008. The biggest increases were in sports editors (from six to 11), columnists (from 44 to 48) and copy editors (from 26 in 2010 to 37 last year), but the biggest drop was among reporters (from 107 in 2010 to 48 in 2012). Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Minnesota basketball not so good lately

 

No playoffs since 2004 for the Timberwolves. For the Gophers, there have been no NCAA post-season victories since Tubby Smith took over the men’s basketball program. After back-to-back years in 2009-2010 when they did make the tournament, it’s been tough sledding for basketb1all in this state. The only glimmer of hope came last year when the Gophers did go 5-1 in the NIT as runner-up to Stanford. The Timberwolves made headlines this season by turning back the clock, deliberately composing a virtually all-White team for 2012-13. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Message to student-athletes: ‘No means no!’

 

Apparently based on recent events, two suggested prerequisite courses for all college studentathletes at all three NCAA division schools should be, first, an English class on the true meaning of the word “no,” and second a class on “making right choices.”

A former Hamline University men’s basketball player was recently charged with felony second-degree assault after he allegedly hit a woman in the face while in Spokane, Washington on New Year’s Eve. When she heard about the incident, Crystal Flint briefly chatted with one of her sons: “I told him that no one knew how it was going to turn, [but] somebody has to do the morally correct thing and go…at least tell somebody,” she recalls. If Flint, herself a former University of Minnesota student-athlete, is successful in convincing her youngster to do the “morally correct thing,” it will help eradicate the notion of individual willfulness embedded in too many young people’s minds that falsely tells them that whatever they do, rightly or wrongly, is acceptable these days. This notion we adults have somehow, consciously or unconsciously, planted and watered in them, thus enabling them and bankrupting them morally. This is even more so if the young person has been tagged a “star athlete” in his or her formative years, depriving them of understanding and of consistently hearing the word “no.” Sometimes we see a dangerous pattern developing and allow it to go unchecked. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

NCAA grant targets sports admin glass ceiling St. Paul native calls Augsburg job ‘a perfect fit’

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Jennifer Jacobs is among the few Black females in the Twin Cities currently working in athletic administration. She is finding it “a perfect fit” for her. Jacobs, a St. Paul native, was named assistant director for compliance at Augsburg College in Minneapolis last summer as part of a two-year NCAA Division III Ethnic Minority and Women’s Internship Grant program. The two-year grant is designated for Division III institutions to hire full-time interns. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Twitter accounts pose new challenges for college athletes

A new study has found that college student-athletes use Twitter to stay in contact with family and friends, but it also allows fans to be overly negative toward the players. “The Positives and Negatives of Twitter: Exploring How Student Athletes Use Twitter and Respond to Critical Tweets” by Clemson Assistant Communication Studies Professor Jimmy Sanderson and Baylor Assistant Communication Professor Blair Browning, is based on interviews with 20 NCAA athletes. The co-authors also reported that players often get post-game comments that are “critical or even abusive…both performance-wise and personally.” Browning calls such tweets “modern…hate mail.”

The MSR recently asked four University of Minnesota student athletes about their Twitter use:

Junior Maverick Ahanmisi says he occasionally uses it to post pictures “or maybe when I have something that’s really on my mind, then I will use it. I really don’t use it that much.”

“I just got a Twitter account a few months ago, and I’m on it very rarely,” admits senior Leah Cotton. “I use it, but not that often,” adds senior Andre Ingram. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,