Racial and Gender Report Card

Recent Articles

Diversity report shows NBA leading sports industry — Except in Minnesota, where it still lags far behind




The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) annually publishes the Racial and Gender Report Card (RGRC) reports on professional and college sport to measure racial and gender improvement, stagnation and regression in decision making, and other key positions. The MSR annually devotes more attention to RGRC author Richard Lapchick’s grades than does any other media in town. No speculation as to why the local pro teams and the state’s largest university diversity efforts don’t merit the same smell test analysis by mainstream media that it does here. TIDES last week continued its annual RGRC series with the 2012-13 NBA. The Major League Baseball RGRC was released earlier this year, and we briefly reported it.  A quick recap: The Minnesota Twins, as usual, failed in its diversity grade. Continue Reading →

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Latest report card on diversity in sports editing shows no improvement



Dr. Richard Lapchick called his first sports editors report card on racial hiring in 2006 “most discouraging.” His latest report, released March 1, hasn’t changed. The 2012 Associated Press Sports Editors (APSE) Racial and Gender Report Card, published by The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) gave an overall C+ grade for racial hiring practices at APSE member newspapers and websites. It was the same grade awarded two years ago. However, the report shows that actually the number of Black male and females at all four circulation-size (A, B, C, D) newspapers have barely changed since 2008. The biggest increases were in sports editors (from six to 11), columnists (from 44 to 48) and copy editors (from 26 in 2010 to 37 last year), but the biggest drop was among reporters (from 107 in 2010 to 48 in 2012). Continue Reading →

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NFL continues to score high in hiring diversity

Third in an occasional series

Historically, pro football has been slow to embrace racial diversity, especially at high-profile positions such as quarterback and coach. There was a nearly seven-decade gap between the hiring of Blacks as head coaches in the National Football League. It wasn’t until the 1960s that Blacks broke down the color barrier in playing quarterback, football’s central “thinking” position, but teams didn’t rush to undertake their deconstruction project in this regard. As a result, the NFL’s on-field diversity was slower to arrive than that of other pro leagues, but according to the 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card (RGRC), the league has scored its third consecutive high grade on racial hiring. To read more about this story, pick up a copy of the MSR newspaper:



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Brushes with history worth noting as WNBA season concludes

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer


This 2012 WNBA season is now history. Throughout the league’s 16th season the MSR brushed with several historical “firsts” — persons who did something that hadn’t been done before and, in some cases, hasn’t been duplicated.  

Tamara Moore — the first  Minneapolitan

“I am so grateful for the opportunity that I had with the Lynx,” says the team’s first and only Minneapolis-born player. A former 2002 first-round pick by Miami, Moore was traded to Minnesota in June 2002 for Betty Lennox and a future first-round pick, which at the time was considered a controversial trade. “To be the first…and being part of the program and seeing where it is right now is a great experience,” Moore says. Continue Reading →

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WNBA sets the standard while Lynx falls behind on race







First in an occasional series


The WNBA recently scored its 10th top grade for race in the 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card (RGRC), which is published annually by the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES). TIDES director and the report’s principal author Richard Lapchick and his staff uses data from the WNBA team media guides, and the league office provides personnel data to evaluate and determine final grades. The September 5 report said that the league set “the standard for racial and gender diversity among all professional leagues” as it scored an A for the sixth consecutive year. The Minnesota Lynx has had only two Black head coaches, five Black assistant coaches (2006 was the only year in team history when the entire coaching staff was Black) and one Black vice president in its 13-year history. However, the team has not hired any Blacks for other top management positions such as general manager, public relations director and community relations director; or professional administration positions such as marketing, promotions, publications and various other department heads that Lapchick annually grades. Continue Reading →

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