TIDES

Recent Articles

WNBA sets the standard while Lynx falls behind on race

 

 

 

 

 

 

First in an occasional series

 

The WNBA recently scored its 10th top grade for race in the 2012 Racial and Gender Report Card (RGRC), which is published annually by the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES). TIDES director and the report’s principal author Richard Lapchick and his staff uses data from the WNBA team media guides, and the league office provides personnel data to evaluate and determine final grades. The September 5 report said that the league set “the standard for racial and gender diversity among all professional leagues” as it scored an A for the sixth consecutive year. The Minnesota Lynx has had only two Black head coaches, five Black assistant coaches (2006 was the only year in team history when the entire coaching staff was Black) and one Black vice president in its 13-year history. However, the team has not hired any Blacks for other top management positions such as general manager, public relations director and community relations director; or professional administration positions such as marketing, promotions, publications and various other department heads that Lapchick annually grades. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

NCAA has little to say about Black-White graduation disparity gap

 

 

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

All last week, endless bracket stories were told ad nauseam. But not a Mavis Staples hoot about Richard Lapchick’s annual “Keeping Score When it Counts” report on NCAA men’s and women’s tournament teams.

Lapchick, director of The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES), each year examines the Graduation Success Rates (GSR) and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for these teams, and also compares Black and White male and female basketball student-athletes. “The enormous gap between the graduation rates of White and African-American student-athletes narrowed by almost four percent,” wrote Lapchick in his March 12 report: White male players graduate at 88 percent, down from 91 percent in 2011; and 60 percent of Black males graduate, a percent higher than last year. Also, White female players’ graduation rate is 93 percent compared to 85 percent for Black females.  

His study also noted that a combined 13 schools — 10 women’s and three men’s — have a higher Black graduation rate than Whites’; and 31 schools — 22 women’s and nine men’s — have a 100-percent graduation rate for both Black and White players. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,