United Negro College Fund

Recent Articles

Black colleges may be better option for Black students

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

A new United Negro College Fund (UNCF) study finds that Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) often outperform non-HBCUs in educating Black students. The study, “Serving Students and the Public Good: HBCUs and the Washington Monthly College Rankings,” was released in October by the UNCF’s Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute. Based on the 2012 Washington Monthly college rankings, it found that 83 percent of HBCUs were above the median among 249 liberal arts colleges and 50 percent above the median for graduating students from low-income families. It also points out:

• HBCUs “consistently rank in the top 50 percent” of schools in both overall rankings and social mobility ranking. • HBCUs seem to be more successful in graduating students from “disadvantaged backgrounds…and tend to perform at an above-average level and significantly better than when they are evaluated strictly on the basis of actual graduation rates.”

• HBCUs “have a long-standing commitment to provide educational access to all students.”

College rankings, such as in the U.S. News and World Report, are commonly used by school officials to highlight the institution’s many features to attract students. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Black student-athletes grad rates ‘nothing to applaud’ — ‘Corporate business’ culture produces profits, exploits students

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

 

University of Minnesota Black male student-athletes are graduating at 50 percent or better for the first time in five years, though a significant graduation gap still exists between them and their White counterparts. For Black women, however, the gap widens. The NCAA 2012 Graduation Success Rate (GSR) report in October noted that all U-M student athletes who entered either as first-time freshmen, entered at mid-year or transferred into the school from 2002-2005 are graduating at 83 percent. Yet, Minnesota’s Black male graduation rate is 55 percent, and 67 percent for Black females, while White males and females graduate at 79 percent and 95 percent respectively. The NCAA created the annual GSR report released each fall in 2005 to more accurately reflect actual graduation rates. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Cities’ youth hear celebrities’ success stories

 

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Singer-songwriter Ledisi, nationally syndicated radio talk host Warren BallentineWarren Ballentine, and actress Kim Coles were panelists at the half-day United Negro College Fund “Empower Me Tour” stop in Minneapolis October 13 at Dunwoody College of Technology. Each told a packed auditorium of Twin Cities middle- and high-school students how they overcame personal struggles until they eventually achieved success. Ledisi Anibade Young — her first name is Nigerian and means “to come forth” — was born in New Orleans and left home at age 18, later forming a group named after her middle name in 1995. However, she said initially she wasn’t able to convince record execs, who often told her, “You sound good, but we don’t know what to do with you.”

After opening for Chaka Khan, Ledisi was signed by Verve in 2000, and the twice-Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter said she now has four albums to her credit. “I am living my parents’ dream,” she said proudly. Continue Reading →

Filed under: , , , , , , ,