Recent Articles

The War on Poverty: 50 years later

On January 8, 1964, a mere six weeks after taking office, President Lyndon B. Johnson stood before the nation to deliver his first State of the Union address. In his address President Johnson proclaimed that “This administration declares unconditional war on poverty in America. The richest nation on earth can afford to win it. We cannot afford to lose it. For the war against poverty will not be won here in Washington. Continue Reading →

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Ford Foundation’s new president: ‘This is not about our brand’

Favors ‘programs…informed by those affected whom we seek to empower’
Editor’s Note: In September, 2013, Darren Walker (DW) became the second African American and 10th president of the Ford Foundation, America’s second largest philanthropy organization with $500 million in annual giving. After a stint in international law and banking, Walker served as the COO of a nonprofit agency in New York before moving to the foundation world, first arriving at the Rockefeller Foundation before being tapped to fill a vice president slot at Ford in 2010. He was interviewed in his New York office by Khalil Abdullah, national reporter for New America Media (NAM). NAM: What excites you most about taking on the presidency of the Ford Foundation? DW: I have a chance to make a difference by leading a remarkable institution committed to social justice when the very notion of social justice is being contested. Continue Reading →

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Free Angela provides a brilliant, invaluable look into America’s history


Movie Review

By Dwight Hobbes

Contributing Writer


It is sad to see how complacent we Black people have grown since the 1960s. The bourgeoisie blithely transitioned from a populace who once vowed “We Will Overcome” to a generation whose abiding principle now is “I have overcome.” You’d scarcely believe there was a time when Black America was determined to revolt against entrenched, institutionalized racism by, as Malcolm X said, any means necessary. This country’s rulers realized back then that the bill had come due. Too many African Americans were longer shuffling along, head bowed, yassuhing and no ma’aming. Too many had their shoulders squared, braced to put their feet in the nation’s behind. Continue Reading →

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Entrepreneur creates dentures with special appeal to people of color

Entrepreneur creates dentures with special appeal to people of color

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer


In this week’s segment of our multi-part series on Black business, we take a look at a profession that is on the decline among African Americans. According to the American Dental Association diversity data, the number of Black dentists has been declining since the mid-1990s. As a result, both locally and nationally dental technician Randy Jackson is among a rare breed these days. Before the 1960s, dentists did all the work. During that time technician training in dental colleges and vocational schools was created, says Jackson, who attended vocational school for dental technicians after he served in Vietnam in 1975. Continue Reading →

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Mr. Bellecourt is right!

‘Redskins’ controversy heats up again
This column identifies with, respects and supports Clyde Bellecourt’s request to NFL, Minnesota Vikings and Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority, don’t use “Redskins,” even if the NFL does. We stand in unity against racism, for far too long a part of the American and Minnesota landscapes. The Jewish owner of the Washington NFL team, Dan Snyder, is doing one of three things: (1) carrying on the racist legacy of George Preston Marshall’s ghost, (2) being tone deaf to fans who understand how racist it is, or (3) at first didn’t know but now knows and doesn’t care, an example of both #1 and #2. This is a wake-up call to racism deniers: foul racism still exists. George Preston Marshall, the owner who gave the team its name in 1932, was a leader in the NFL movement that officially banned Blacks, league wide, in 1933, a ban not lifted until 1947. Continue Reading →

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