World War II

Recent Articles

In memory of three great men

By Charles Hallman
Staff writer

 

We lost three individuals this April; I personally didn’t know each of them, but came close to meeting one of them. Charles Sumner “Chuck” Stone, Jr. died April 6 of congestive heart failure at an assisted-living facility in North Carolina at the age of 89. Born in 1924 in St. Louis, he was a Tuskegee Airman in World War II. Then, instead of attending Harvard — who accepted him, he instead went to and graduated from Wesleyan University in 1948, and later earned his master’s from the University of Chicago. Continue Reading →

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George Washington and his Black slaves

 

By Dr. Luke Tripp

Guest Commentator

 

The sanitized image of America is built with a chronological sequence of myths and distortions. The American Revolution is falsely presented as a righteous struggle of American colonists against British tyranny. Actually, this war had little to do with lofty values and beliefs in freedom, justice, liberty, and the dignity of humankind. Moreover, a critical examination of the American Revolution reveals a struggle for more political power, economic control, and material wealth between two White elite groups rather than a heroic struggle between the forces of freedom and tyranny. George Washington is portrayed as a hero who fought to end oppression under the rule of King George III. Continue Reading →

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Rondo resident’s pioneer athletic efforts recognized

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

Marcenia Lyle Stone was born July 17, 1921 in St. Paul. She played on the local boys’ baseball teams despite her parents’ objections. Reportedly, they wanted their little girl to focus as much or even more on her studies as on athletics. Nonetheless, Stone excelled in several sports, but baseball was her first love. Continue Reading →

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Black farmers fight to retain land ownership

 
Modern-day struggle renews, redefines 40-acers-and-a-mule promise
 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Land ownership, which signaled both privilege and power, was a European concept brought to the country. “The way we think about property is a European tradition,” notes Maria Wiseman, an assistant solicitor in the Division of Indian Affairs with the U.S. Interior Department. Wiseman and the University of Wisconsin’s Katrina Quisumbling King and Jess Gilbert last month discussed the significance of Black farmland ownership in the Rural South at the Black Environmental Thought II conference at the University of Minnesota. The “40 acres and a mule” promise was a result of Special Field Order No. 15 issued by General William T. Sherman in 1865 that was intended to make available “hundreds of thousands of acres of confiscated and abandoned Confederate lands to former slaves for settlement,” explained Wiseman. Continue Reading →

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