Cable TV competition could lower Mpls rates

Is Minneapolis big enough to have two cable systems? CenturyLink says yes, and hopes the Minneapolis City Council will approve their proposal sometime this month.

Comcast currently has a cable franchise to serve Minneapolis until 2021, and there has been only one company serving the entire city since 1983. CenturyLink late last year announced that they would seek approval to operate cable service in the city as well through its Prism TV, which currently operates in 14 markets across the country.

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Are we seeing Black feminism on prime time TV?

She said she didn’t see herself as a feminist until after she read Morgan’s When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as A Hip Hop Feminist (2000) while attending Temple University. “For me it’s about reclaiming a type of humanity that we’ve been not given access to. We need permission [as Black females] to be human.”

Story says she “declared” herself a feminist while in college at DePaul. “I was the only Black girl women’s studies major for my first three years.” But because she refused to act and dress like fellow feminists, “Somehow I was doing feminism wrong,” recalled the professor. “I was much more hard core” than the young White feminists at the time, she added.

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Bloomington’s ‘Special Presentation’ on Black History involved no Blacks

On Sunday, February 22, in honor of Black History Month, the Bloomington Historical Society and the Human Rights Commission of Bloomington, Minnesota invited the public to a free “Special Presentation” on the use of quilts by slaves seeking their freedom via the Underground Railroad. Deb Meyer, from Henderson, MN was hired by the Bloomington Historical Society to present and unravel the mystery behind quilts and the coded patterns sewn on them to guide slaves along the Underground Railroad.

The room in Bloomington’s Old Town Hall, 10200 Penn. Ave. S., was filled to capacity with just over 100 people, 90 percent of them women. Besides the MSR writer covering the event, there was only one other African American present. Neither the audience, the Bloomington Historical Society, nor the presenter appeared to see anything amiss in discussing a controversial subject in Black history without any involvement of Black people or others knowledgeable about Black history and culture.

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Sister Spokesman talks networking with purpose and style

Networking doesn’t have to feel awkward or forced if you take the time to find techniques that fit your style and objectives. That was one of the many takeaways from Sister Spokesman’s “Networking with Purpose” event, held March 7, at Sabathani Community Center in south Minneapolis. The event brought together a colorful mix of community members, vendors, and an expert panel of entrepreneurs who shared their experiences and best practices.
The afternoon kicked off with games, including an “elevator pitch” exercise that saw attendees work the room to practice highlighting their passions, skill sets, and career objectives for maximum impact. The panel discussion soon followed, with each of the panelists answering questions presented by attendees, and Tracey Williams-Dillard, host and MSR Publisher/CEO.

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Police officer shot in North Minneapolis

The shooting and wounding of African American police officer Jordan Davis, at 5:30 am Saturday, February 21, 2015, had all the possibilities of creating significant tension and conflict. Andrew Neal, also African American, is in custody and charged in the shooting. Here’s the twist: Neal was a paid informant for the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD) in the ’90s.

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Is MPR for Black folk?

After nearly six months as Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) program director, veteran newsman Jonathan Blakley is overseeing “a variety of new podcasts [and] new voices.”

MPR isn’t just for the so-called purists, stated Blakley in a recent MSR interview at MPR’s St. Paul headquarters. His overall goal since assuming his duties last November is to bring fresh voices over its airwaves as well as to help dispel the oft-entertained notion among many Blacks and other people of color that public radio is too highbrow for them.

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Reflecting on ‘The Look’ and other human interactions

My grandson Malcolm (“Rocket”) gave me the coldest stare. I really hadn’t done anything. I was holding him and talking with his mom, Shavon, and his sister Maya.

Shavon asked, “Maya, did you pick that mess up in your room from last night?” Knowing she hadn’t completed the task, Maya quickly started to respond. With her head cocked to the side, a twinkle in her eye, and a devious smile, she suddenly stopped and said, “Okay, let me stop right now before that lie comes out of my mouth.”

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