Monthly Archives: August 2012

Hot headliners hit the Selby Ave. music festival

 

It is with great pride and pleasure to announce, it’s time to kick back and enjoy one of the best free music festivals in the upper Midwest. I’m talking about the 2012 Selby Ave. JazzFest happening on Saturday, September 8, 11 am — 8 pm, at Selby Avenue and Milton in St. Paul. The festival is presented by Golden Thyme Coffee Cafe and is now in its 11th year. Continue Reading →

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The rulers’ goal is to put ya’ll back in chains

 

“He’s going to let the big banks write their own rules, unchain Wall Street. They are going to put ya’ll back in chains,” said Joe Biden in remarks that have stirred controversy. The Obama administration has stuck by and backed Biden’s comment because it wants to believe that Black folks are simple enough to believe that the “they” are simply the Republican Party. Obama is hoping that we will not see the inherent “Freudian slip” in Biden’s remarks. It’s important to note, that Biden did not say us, but ya’ll; he was not talking about himself, because he is a lackey for the ruling, the propertied, the monied class. Continue Reading →

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Please publish accurate information on SCSU Black graduation rates

 

 

As St. Cloud State approaches the 2012-2013 school year, projections are that the university will continue its trend of welcoming growing numbers of students of color, including Black or African American students. In the last decade, enrollment of Black or African American students has increased at St. Cloud State from 173 total students in 2000 to 842 in the fall of 2011. This has been a gradual, purposeful growth as SCSU has sought to enhance the diversity of its student body to reflect the population of Minnesota. In a recent Spokesman-Recorder, a commentator implied that while the university attracts growing numbers of Black students, only a small percentage of those enrolled will successfully reach graduation. That statement is false, as we have informed you previously. Continue Reading →

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Why are so many Black men dying?

 

 

By Terry Yzaguirre

Guest Commentator

 

As I arrived at the homicide scene on 21st and Penn Avenue North in Minneapolis on August 18at about 9 am, the crime lab was still working on the bullet holes on the exterior of the home after a shooting occurred around 3 am leaving one man dead and another wounded. Except for a group of about five people, the streets were desolate. The Black community’s radio station KMOJ located just down the street had no one present to update its listeners to the latest brother shot down. If the Black press in Minneapolis does not give a damn when a brother, sister, or our children are murdered, then why should anyone else? As I continued to monitor the scene, two female medical examiners carrying the blue body bag of the deceased walked out the front door. Continue Reading →

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WNBA partnership offers internships, mentoring for Black youth

 
But will the Lynx join this national diversity effort?  

 

The WNBA recently has joined forces with 100 Black Men of America to create more mentoring opportunities for Blacks. 100 Black Men was founded in New York City in 1963 and then became a national organization with nine chapters in 1986. Today there are 116 chapters in the United States, England and the Caribbean with members who include corporate executives, physicians, attorneys, entrepreneurs, educators and men from numerous other professions. Two key components of the WNBA-100 Black Men partnership is a Dads and Daughters program and for two members of the Collegiate 100, an auxiliary organization to 100 Black Men, to be considered for a summer internship at the league’s New York headquarters. Continue Reading →

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Jackie Robinson’s fight against racism: the untold story

 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Jackie Robinson’s legacy and life story has been told and retold over the years, but mostly it has been focused on his historical breaking of baseball’s color line after World War II. “The thing that people don’t know about him [is] that my father was on fire for social justice from the very beginning,” said Sharon Robinson on her father during a recent visit to the Twin Cities during the RBI World Series. A prime example of this was when Jackie Robinson got court-martialed as an Army officer: “He was stationed at Fort Hood, Texas as a second lieutenant” after graduating from officer training school in 1943, explained his daughter. “When he graduated, they [the Army] didn’t want him to be an officer so they sent him to the middle of nowhere, in the Deep South and Jim Crow.”

One day while riding on a local bus into town, Robinson saw “a light-skinned Black woman, but the bus driver thought she was White,” continued Sharon. Since he knew her, Robinson sat in the “White” section — the front of the bus. Continue Reading →

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Larry Fitzgerald, Jr. reaps rewards for giving back

SCOTTSDALE, AZ — Monday, August 27, I’m on the road again doing what I do. This time, I’m not covering a game or sporting event. As many of you know, my oldest son Larry, Jr., NFL star with the Arizona Cardinals, has done many good things on and off the field. Two weeks ago, he was named the 2012 NFL Arthur S. Arkush Humanitarian Award winner. Celebrity Fight Night, the annual charity event held by Muhammad Ali, presented Larry, Jr. an award as well. Continue Reading →

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Ronnie Laws and Tom Browne: Jazz-funk giants joined forces at Dakota

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

“Always There” (1975) and “Funkin’ for Jamaica” (1979) are legendary songs for Ronnie Laws and Tom Browne, respectively. A member of a musical family — brother Hubert Laws on flute and sisters Eloise Laws and Debra Laws as vocalists —Ronnie taught himself the alto sax at age 11, and he studied music both in high school and at Stephen F. Austin and Texas Southern Universities. He relocated from his native Texas to Los Angeles in 1970, and after receiving his formative training with jazz pianist Walter Bishop, Jr. and organist Doug Cann, Laws also worked with such legends as the Jazz Crusaders and Hugh Masekela. Before signing a solo record deal with Blue Note Records in the mid-1970s, Laws also was an early member of Earth, Wind and Fire. Produced by the Crusaders’ Wayne Henderson, Laws’ breakout debut album, Pressure Sensitive (1975), featured his first hit “Always There.” That song is considered one of the most popular crossover hits of the late 1970s and sounds just as fresh today. Continue Reading →

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Youth Development League motivates youth to excellence

 

Some people gain inspiration from their childhood difficulties and overcome their environments, subsequently reaching back to help others with similar backgrounds. Such is the case with Joyce Lester, the executive director of the Youth Development League (YDL), a nonprofit program of the Metro Education and Outreach Services (MEOS) agency, which seeks to cultivate youth by introducing them to their world of possibilities.  

 

Joyce says she grew up in the Chicago Housing Authority projects, but the projects didn’t grow up in her. “I’ve lived a blessed life and enjoy motivating youth to excel,” she says. The program provides intensive workshops to increase the youths’ knowledge base and critical thinking skills. Continue Reading →

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