Monthly Archives: August 2013

Recent rulings an attempt to restore confidence in the system

 

 

 

The recent decision by a judge to limit New York City’s Stop and Frisk program, which targeted Black and Brown New Yorkers, and the decision to reduce crack sentences were neither coincidental nor accidental. The folks that are in charge, the real folks, the monied class, the ruling class, the real bosses recognize that the whole Trayvon Martin tragedy took some of the wind out of the sails of the system. Anyone paying attention had to recognize that the system just doesn’t work. Or that it does work, but only for the wealthy and sometimes White upper-class folks. In the case of Trayvon Martin the system worked. Continue Reading →

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“We didn’t know!” Really?

Everybody pretends ignorance or amnesia on Zygi’s dealings
 

Many intelligent, knowledgeable people purposefully said they were surprised by the 21-year-old court ruling against the Wilfs, owners of the Minnesota Vikings. Really? Why do they think we believe them (Star Tribune wrote of it in 2011)? They quietly believed the Wilfs would win. What they “won” is loss of credibility. Continue Reading →

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Blacks need to realize the dream of unity

 

 

 

 

By Jessica Wright

Contributing Writer

 

Martin Luther King Jr., the Black Panther party, Emmett Till, Malcolm X, our very own Tycel Nelson and now Trayvon Martin. All of these African American men, along with women, have been racially profiled, beaten and or/shot and killed because of the color of their skin as well as the position they held in the African American community. They called us together for unity, racial equality and change. It is now 2013 and African Americans still have not found solace in America. African Americans are displaced and have no home to go “back” to. Continue Reading →

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Training doesn’t cure racism

 

 

 

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau tells us “This is not who we are.” Then who are you? Officers are caught being racist and all that happens to them is they get suspended with pay. They are not punished; they are rewarded with a paid vacation. Apparently this is who you are, departmental policy proves it. After being racist, officers get paid time off to go fishing, to sit at home and watch TV. Continue Reading →

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Keith stands his ground — but for what?

 

 

 

Lesli was getting a roll going. He knew he wasn’t going to get a word in edgewise. Not that he had done very much when he had the chance to speak. She stopped roaming around the living room — the way she kept scanning the space, he could’ve sworn she was looking for the heaviest object she could find to brain him with — and stood, hand on hip, the robe coming undone. She didn’t bother retying the belt and simply let him have it, her eyes darkening, glistening. Continue Reading →

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Detroit: down but not out

Detroit News journalist says of Chapter 7, “It’s simply a regrouping”
 
By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

Contrary to recent reports, after filing for bankruptcy protection last month, Detroit is still alive and well. According to some national pundits, the blame for Detroit’s financial woes starts and ends with the city’s five-decades-plus Black leadership, while

others suggest that Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, a Republican, is not committed to helping the state’s largest and historically Democrat-controlled city. The Detroit News last week reported that Snyder as early as April 2012 vowed to help collect “millions of dollars in unpaid income taxes from 54 percent of Detroit residents who work in the suburbs.” If their employers don’t automatically withhold taxes from their paychecks, individuals are required to “estimate and remit the taxes each year on their own,” noted the news report. An estimated $142 million in uncollected income tax revenue in 2009 is owed to Detroit by city residents who work in suburban Detroit, reported the newspaper. It is estimated that Detroit is nearly $19 billion in debt. Continue Reading →

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March on Washington – 50 years later

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. set the stage for the environmental justice movement
 

I  was not alive August 28, 1963. The March on Washington was held 100 years after the Emancipation Proclamation and eight years to the date of the lynching of Emmett Till. Being inquisitive, I look for clues in history that might lead to our freedom from oppression. I often find myself looking through the words of Dr .Martin Luther King for inspiration. I admit that I often skip the “I Have a Dream” speech. Continue Reading →

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U of M takes on Minnesota’s school achievement gap

Goal includes more teachers of color, more ‘partnering’
 
By Lauretta Dawolo Towns

Contributing Writer

 

Last week, we spoke with the leadership of the University of Minnesota’s College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) initiative to reduce Minnesota’s achievement gap. However, we cannot discuss students and their families without focusing on schoolteachers. According to CEHD’s Dean Jean Quam, there are currently 31 percent students of color in the U of M teacher preparation programs. She is hopeful that a new partnership with Teach for America (TFA), which is currently being discussed, will change that number. “They have 38 percent students of color in their teacher corps. We want to work with them to increase that number and improve their teacher preparation program,” she said. Continue Reading →

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Mpls to celebrate March on Washington’s 50th Anniversary

Twin Cities residents organize ‘March to Close the Gaps’
 
By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

The 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington will be recognized with a day of activities Saturday, August 24. Community residents, including several who participated in the historic 1963 gathering on the Washington Mall, will speak at

Sabathani Community Center in South Minneapolis at 10:30 am. “We are trying to bridge the gap between those who went on the original march — there are a number of [local] people who went on that march,” noted Mary Merrill Anderson, who was in junior high when the historic event took place in 1963. “We want to get their perspective on what was on their minds when they went, why they made the sacrifice to go to Washington, D.C., and what they hoped to accomplish.”

At 11:45 am the “March to Close the Gaps” will commence at Sabathani and end at Martin Luther King, Jr. Park at 40th and Nicollet. There, 12:30 pm, retired historian Mahmoud El-Kati and others will reflect on Dr. King and the march. Continue Reading →

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