communities of color

Recent Articles

White professionals already cashing in on ‘People’s Stadium’ — But promises that construction will benefit communities of color remain unkept as deadlines approach

 

 

 

By Mel Reeves

Contributing Writer

 

While there is much talk about possible delays in the construction of the “People’s Stadium,” it appears that the Vikings and MSFA are still confident it will be built. And according to a recent Associated Press (AP) article entitled, “Many already cashing in on Vikings stadium,” lots of white collar professionals have already profited from the proposed stadium. Incidentally, it appears at this point that the only people who may be left out of the benefits are people of color. Despite lots of compelling testimony last Friday at the Minnesota Sports Facility Authority (MSFA) meeting by several prominent African Americans and Somali leaders, it was all but ignored. Practically all of the media outlets in the Twin Cities were in attendance, but none reported [as of yet] or followed up with the testimony of the Black folks who were complaining that it appears that Blacks may yet again be left out of a major development project. MSFA Board Chair Michelle Kelm-Helgen, who seemed a bit annoyed by the testimony, did respond. Continue Reading →

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Lawyers’ committee submits testimony to senate hearing: ‘Ending the School-to-Prison Pipeline’

 

By Lawyers’ Committee staff

Contributing Writers

 

The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law (LCCRUL) applauds Senator Richard J. Durbin for convening the important hearing “Ending the School-to-Prison Pipeline” before the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Human Rights on December 12. This hearing will expose the deep inequality in disciplinary practices plaguing our public schools and its damaging effects on our youth. The school-to-prison pipeline refers to the practice of pushing students out of the classroom and into the justice system through use of harsh exclusionary discipline policies. Within the past two decades, many schools have increased their reliance on law enforcement officers and exclusionary policies, such as out-of-school suspension and expulsion, as a means of reducing school disruption. As a result, too many of our most vulnerable youth find themselves excluded from the classroom setting, arrested, and/or referred to juvenile court for what might be viewed as common misbehavior. Continue Reading →

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Communities of color suffer from lack of health insurance

 
Healthcare advocates predict Affordable Care Act will treat disparities

By Charles Hallman 

Staff Writer

 

Although the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will be fully implemented by the end of 2014, several aspects of it already has been put in place. For instance, young adults and children with preexisting conditions no longer can be denied health insurance because of ACA changes already in effect. Over the next few months the MSR will be highlighting changes yet to come. Healthcare experts and advocates argue that Blacks and other people of color in this country have disproportionately high numbers of uninsured and underinsured adults and children. As a result, the ACA, which became law in March 2010, will help address the racial and ethnic disparities that now exist in the U.S., states Kaiser Family Foundation Disparities Policy Project Director Cara James. Continue Reading →

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