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Recent Articles

What is­ bariatric surgery?

By Dr. Laura July, MD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bariatric surgery is also called weight-loss surgery. These are procedures performed on dangerously obese people for the purpose of losing weight.  

Why should I care about bariatric surgery? 

Over the last 30 years, obesity rates have doubled for adults and tripled for children. Sixty-seven percent of adults in the U.S. are either overweight or obese, with 18 million being morbidly obese, meaning 100 pounds or more overweight. There are more than 40 health problems associated with obesity including things such as Type II diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, high cholesterol, arthritis, infertility, liver and gallbladder disease, depression, sleep apnea, and certain types of cancer. Continue Reading →

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What is psoriasis and why should I care about it?

 

Psoriasis is an itchy skin condition that appears as patches and plaques of dry, scaly skin located most commonly on the elbows, knees and scalp. Psoriasis, however, can occur anywhere. Sometimes it can be very mild with just a couple of spots, and in other cases it can be quite severe and widespread. Psoriasis can also make your fingernails and toenails rough and discolored with small pits.  

Why  should I care  about 

psoriasis? Psoriasis is extremely common, and approximately five percent of all people have this skin disease. Continue Reading →

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How to get all the vitamin D you need

 

 

 

Welcome, MSR readers, to a new section you will see appear regularly in these pages, something we call Green2Green. Most of you by now have heard of the green movement to clean up our planet, stop the waste of precious natural resources, and get climate change under control. What is not always clear is just what this movement means to each one of us in our everyday lives. Nor is it always clear how this movement includes environmental justice issues of particular concern to communities of color. And finally, it is not always clear how the green movement can also save us green, as in Benjamin green, and is creating new opportunities for productive careers. Continue Reading →

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What is Alzheimer’s disease and why should I care about it?

Alzheimer’s disease — the most common cause of dementia — is a group of brain disorders that cause a loss of intellectual and social skills. “Dementia” is an umbrella term describing multiple diseases and conditions that develop when nerve cells (neurons) in the brain die or are unable to function normally. Continue Reading →

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Adding race to the ACE (Study)

Currently, in social service circles across the nation the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study is becoming a focal point on understanding and treating clients. Dr. Vincent J. Felitti originally conducted the ACE study in 1985. The original study was created from a weight-loss program for people with obesity. That study produced a result that showed that many of the participants unconsciously used their obesity as a shield against unwanted sexual attention, and many had been sexually or physically abused as children. The study was reproduced in the 1990s with the addition of Dr. Robert F. Anda. Continue Reading →

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Focus on real policies that help women, not bogus conspiracy theories

Columnist Lucky Rosenbloom wrongly attributes to the Guttmacher Institute the claim — itself false — that abortion providers “target” African American women [column of April 11]. In reality, disproportionately high abortion (and unplanned birth) rates among women of color are the direct result of their higher rates of unintended pregnancy, which in turn reflect economic and social inequalities that are widespread and pervasive. The result is stark disparities not only on various reproductive health outcomes, but also on a broad range of health indicators, including high rates of diabetes, heart disease, AIDS and cancer. Antiabortion activists ignore these systemic inequities and instead cynically accuse abortion providers of targeting minority women. In fact, fewer than one in 10 abortion clinics are located in predominantly African American neighborhoods. Continue Reading →

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Get out of your own way: a heart-to-heart on Black women’s health

 

 

 

Dear Sistergirlfriend: We need to talk… The three top killers of sisters are HIV/AIDS, heart disease and cancer…in that order. I’m not trying to scare you, but you should be concerned, and I’m concerned for ya! I’m not gonna preach at you about using condoms or being selective with your partners or to watch your cholesterol, manage stress, etc. What I do want to talk about, is your mind. Continue Reading →

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Diabetes rates have nearly doubled in 20 years

People of color especially at risk
 
The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) estimates that about 80,000 adults in Minnesota may have diabetes without knowing it. Given the seriousness of the disease, the Minnesota Department of Health is encouragingMinnesotans to ask themselves whether they are at risk for diabetes and to take steps to improve their health. The percentage of adults in Minnesota who are living with diabetes nearly doubled between 1994 and 2010, and these numbers under-represent the true number of people living with the condition. About 290,000 adults in Minnesota, or 7.3 percent, say they have been told by their healthcare team they have diabetes. National data show that only 75 percent of adults with diabetes know that they have the disease. Continue Reading →

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First annual Baraza conference ‘a huge success’

Event launches movement to improve Black women’s health and wellness
 

Part 2 — see part one in the current print edition of the MSR

By Robin James

Contributing Writer

The October 6 Baraza Conference presentation by Dr. BraVada Garrett-Akinsanya, Ph.D., was titled “Claiming Your Right to Wellness: Sisters in Recovery from Life” and addressed powerful issues such as trauma, grief and loss as they relate to both personal and professional relationships, and offered the audience exercises to improve wellness of mind, body, and spirit. Dr. Akinsanya is a licensed clinical psychologist and executive director of the African American Child Wellness Institute. One of the things she discussed during her talk was cognitive reframing, such as when one thinks of a glass as half full or half empty. So, when you do reframing, what you do is look at a situation from another side. Dr. Akinsanya asked the audience to think of one negative thing you say about yourself that keeps you locked down. Continue Reading →

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