Recent Articles

Until there’s a cure, prevention is our best hope for controlling HIV/AIDS

Most skin diseases occur in people of all nationalities, regardless of their skin color. Certain problems encountered in the skin are more common in people with different hues of skin, and sometimes a disorder seems more prominent because it affects skin color. This week continues our review of these disorders and their treatment.  

Dermatosis papulosa nigra

This most commonly occurs in African American patients. Being diagnosed with HIV, a potentially life-threatening disease, can be extremely troubling, but with proper treatment, HIV infection is no longer the automatic death sentence it used to be. Unfortunately, AIDS continues to devastate the African American community, as well as parts of Africa, Haiti and Asia where good treatments are not readily available. Continue Reading →

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African American sisters aging with HIV and co-morbidities

Imani (not her real name) was 32 when she contracted HIV. Surrounded by sister-friends who died from the virus, Imani did not expect to reach middle age. Now in her fifth decade of life, Imani has new and multiple challenges. She self-manages her HIV — along with her diabetes and hypertension — while searching for employment. The result of these stressors is depression. Continue Reading →

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Budget sequestration will undermine fight against HIV

On March 1, federal budget sequestration went into effect. This will result in across-the-board cuts of 5.3 percent in most non-defense discretionary programs, including Ryan White, HIV prevention, HIV research, AIDS housing support, and prevention and treatment programs for people with substance abuse problems.

By withholding vital funding from essential HIV programs that have seen minimal increases in recent years, these looming cuts will undermine efforts to achieve the targets set forth in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. The most severe effects will be felt in Black America, which has been more heavily affected by the HIV epidemic than any other racial or ethnic group. We are at a deciding moment in the trajectory of the AIDS epidemic. We are either going to decide to do what’s necessary to end the epidemic in this country, or we’re going to decide to continue to see American citizens get infected, get sick and die from AIDS. Continue Reading →

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Documentary confronts us with the grim realities of Black AIDS

By Dwight Hobbes

Contributing Writer


Released earlier this year, Endgame: AIDS in Black America (PBS-DVD), produced and directed by Renata Stone for WGBH/FRONTLINE, is an important documentary for the subject alone, keeping up awareness of a medical crisis many choose not to think about, much less candidly discuss. Stone also is producer of The Age of AIDS 2006’s award-winning FRONTLINE (PBS). Endgame brings sobering information. One bit of unwelcome news: Phill Wilson, head of the Black AIDS Institute, states at a World AIDS Day convention, “If Black America was a country unto itself, it would have the 16th worse epidemic in the world. Today in America, two-thirds of new cases of HIV among women will be Black… Seventy percent of the new HIV cases of youth will be Black.”

These facts alone are compelling reason to know more about the health issue of HIV than simply because you don’t want to catch it. Continue Reading →

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