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Recent Articles

No wonder East African students say they don’t feel safe at school

 

We humans have been blaming and scapegoating the most vulnerable minority group among us for thousands of years: It’s an age-old tradition. I recently overheard a man say, “Yeah, the West Bank area in Minneapolis used to be a nice neighborhood, but then the East Africans moved in.”

Well, now he knows how Native Americans felt when the White man moved into Dakota Territory and ruined their neighborhoods. At least the newly arrived East Africans have come in peace and not forced us off the land and given us some desolate, windblown reservation in South Dakota to live on. When the police showed up at South High School to break up the “food fight,” students in the lunch room said the police only went after the East African students. The East African students took the full brunt of the police response. Continue Reading →

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Financial aid workshops, free ACT exams to boost college applications

Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) is sending a strong message to students, families, staff members and the community that we believe it is imperative that all students be prepared for college, career and life. Providing more students with the right preparation will advance our whole nation. We know that when college is affordable, the chances of college completion increase. Each year hundreds of MPS students fail to get federal college aid because of difficulties completing the required Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). These students are 70 percent less likely to apply to college. Continue Reading →

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Black colleges may be better option for Black students

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

A new United Negro College Fund (UNCF) study finds that Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) often outperform non-HBCUs in educating Black students. The study, “Serving Students and the Public Good: HBCUs and the Washington Monthly College Rankings,” was released in October by the UNCF’s Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute. Based on the 2012 Washington Monthly college rankings, it found that 83 percent of HBCUs were above the median among 249 liberal arts colleges and 50 percent above the median for graduating students from low-income families. It also points out:

• HBCUs “consistently rank in the top 50 percent” of schools in both overall rankings and social mobility ranking. • HBCUs seem to be more successful in graduating students from “disadvantaged backgrounds…and tend to perform at an above-average level and significantly better than when they are evaluated strictly on the basis of actual graduation rates.”

• HBCUs “have a long-standing commitment to provide educational access to all students.”

College rankings, such as in the U.S. News and World Report, are commonly used by school officials to highlight the institution’s many features to attract students. Continue Reading →

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Black Fashion History Day a great success

By Rosa Bogar

Contributing Writer

 

October 21, 2012, was declared “Black Fashion History Day” by Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton. When the governor’s Proclamation was read by “fashion enthusiast” Roger Clark to the crowd gathered at the Capri Theater in North Minneapolis that Sunday evening, it brought down the house with thunderous applause. The event was historic, memorable, and enjoyed by all who attended. The emcee was Carol Payne, who also moderated the panel discussion with panelists Rozenia Hoodfuller, a former model; Jewelean Jackson, former director of the Ms. Black MN Pageant Inc.; Sylvia Loveless-Amos, who designed for the entertainers Prince, Jody Watley, and other noted musicians; and Charles Caldwell, a former model and now owner of C. Caldwell Fine Arts Gallery and Studio. The panel did an outstanding job of informing the audience of what the fashion scene was like during this period known as the “epicenter” of Black fashion in Minnesota. Continue Reading →

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Five million people of color made voting history in 2008

Will voting trend continue in 2012? By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

According to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) approximately five million more voters, including Blacks, Latinos and Asians, went to the polls in the historic 2008 presidential election in which America’s first Black president was elected. However, with the rise in voter suppression laws across the country since 2008, approximately five million voters are expected to be affected, says the ACLU. This includes Blacks and other people of color, the elderly, students, the poor and the disabled. “I don’t think it was any accident that after 2008 we found these huge gains in Blacks and Latinos in voting, as well as Asian Americans and Native Americans voting, then all of a sudden all these Republican-held [state] legislatures decided that voter fraud is a problem,” notes University of Minnesota Journalism Professor Catherine Squires. Continue Reading →

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