Monthly Archives: January 2014

Quite a week for Minneapolis South

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was an interesting week, to say the least, for the Minneapolis South boys’ basketball team. Despite the dismissal of one key player and the benching of two more for disciplinary reasons, the Tigers, led by do-it-all senior point guard KENLEY FARROW, sophomore sensation PAYTON BOWDRY, and sharpshooting junior TARON MYER, played four games in seven days, winning three of them (including two important conference wins) to open up a City Conference race that has five teams in contention for top honors. Washburn (4-1) is alone in first place. South, Southwest and North are tied for second place with 4-2 records. Third place Henry is 3-3. Continue Reading →

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U of M targets financial aid to low-income students

Determined students use Pell grant to graduate almost debt free
 

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

University of Minnesota President Eric Kaler recently announced a new four-year initiative to improve keeping low-income students in college. “We intend to lower the barriers for low-income students to attend the U and obtain their degrees,” said Kaler in a January 16 press release. According to school officials, research shows that low-income students are more likely to drop out of school or delay their degree work due to finances. Approximately 21 percent of U of M undergraduate freshmen (over 1,100) are Pell grant recipients — money from the U.S. government that provides for students to pay for college based on financial need. The MSR last week sat down with four first-year U of M students and Pell grant recipients. Continue Reading →

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St. Cloud State University holds fifth annual Power in Diversity Leadership Conference

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students from several Minnesota colleges and universities joined a few students from other states January 23-26 at St. Cloud State Universities’ Atwood Memorial Center for the fifth annual Power in Diversity Leadership Conference (PDLC). This year’s theme was Today’s Vision: Tomorrow’s Reality. Each year, several keynote speakers are invited to address various issues related to diversity. The six speakers for this year included Tou Ger Bennett Xiong, Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch, Laverne Cox, Joshua Fredburg, Nontombi Naomi Tutu and Jeff Johnson. Continue Reading →

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Humphrey Public Affairs panel agrees: King’s Dream remains a dream, not our reality

By Charles Hallman

Staff Writer

 

The 1964 Civil Rights Act became law 50 years ago, and the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs this year is hosting a series of events to commemorate the historic legislation. Last week’s panel discussion at Cowles Auditorium with local civil rights activists was the beginning. Roy Wilkins Center for Human Relations and Social Justice Chair Dr. Samuel Myers characterized the January 23 event, cosponsored by the center and the African American Leadership Forum, as “a critical discourse and discussion about how far have we come and where we need to go.”

University of St. Thomas Law Professor Nekima Levy-Pounds, the event’s keynote speaker, told the audience of around 40 people that Dr. King’s legacy too often is romanticized, especially his 1963 I Have A Dream speech. “That speech was amazing — according to many people, it is the greatest speech that’s ever been made in American history,” she said. Continue Reading →

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NFL player’s statement drowns out governmental decisions

Just reading the papers and keeping up with social media is clear indication that many of the so-called 99 percent — in the U.S. anyway — have lost their minds. A cornerback in a football game spouting bravado is nationwide news. Really! It caused a lot of silly White folks to go to their racist playbook. You would think those folks would be tired of that racist crap. Continue Reading →

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NAACP activates legal strategy

 

 

 

 

 

 
Local branch joins Doug Mann in Sports Authority law suit
 

One of the traditional strengths of the NAACP movement has been its shrewd planning for taking legal action against those violating rights of African Americans. When you think of the successes of NAACP legal redress committees, you think of such leaders as Walter White, Roy Wilkens and Thurgood Marshall, as well as such historic actions and legal milestones as the 1954 decision of Brown vs. Board of Education and Martin Luther King’s 1968 Poor Peoples March. The legal redress committee, a historic pillar of strength of NAACP branches across America fighting for African American civil rights, is seen once again in the local NAACP branch’s crafty move on the legal front to join the suit of long time NAACP member Doug Mann against the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority (MSFA) for its failure to meet its diversity pledge. With the appointment of long time local branch NAACP supporter Louis King to its executive committee, the trap door has been slammed shut on the MSFA. Continue Reading →

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Special education: stories from a parent’s and a teacher’s perspective

We are sorry that it has taken us this long to publish the second part of our special education column but we had a hard time deciding which stories to publish. We found many of the stories that people shared with us to be disturbing and we did our best to pick the best stories that were representative of the majority of the stories that were reported to us by both staff members and parents who are involved with special education institutions. Again, as stated in the first column our opinion is not reflected in any of the stories published in this column, but I must say that we hope that we as a society — especially in Minnesota — will examine our special education system and determine if it’s accomplishing its intended purpose. We learned while conducting this investigation that we have no idea what the purpose is. I must say that out of all the investigations that we have done, this one caused the most emotional stress, as you will see when you read these stories:

Rodney and Jane who have a kid who started off as a mid-school aged child and now is in high school enrolled in a special education program said, “Our son had some behavior issues in his regular school so we got talked into having him sent to special ed, but we were told that once he got his stuff together that he would be allowed to return to his normal school. Continue Reading →

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Funneling children into the adult criminal justice system

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Marian Wright Edelman

Guest Commentator

 

Children are not little adults. Adolescents are not the same as adults. We’ve known this for years. The research showing that their brains are still developing is clear. Although young people act on impulse, they have the ability to positively change and have a productive future. Continue Reading →

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