Ancestry Books: a convergence of literary cultures

Ancestry Books unequivocally is a boon to writers, readers, and the Twin Cities at large, not in the least because it is located in North Minneapolis (intersection of Penn and Lowry). It is an invaluable enterprise in a day and age of corporate juggernauts overwhelming and banishing small and alternative bookstores to oblivion, running them out of business by a principle of greed trumping need.
It is an important social statement in giving people one more thing to point to in this part of the Twin Cities and cite something besides criminal and otherwise unsavory activity, focusing on the fact that there is much more good than bad going on in that part of town.

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Activism comes naturally to new NAACP officer

Wintana Melekin moved with her family from Eritrea to America in 1989 when she was three years old. Eritrea, which is located in the Horn of Africa, is bordered by Sudan, Ethiopia and Djibouti. Her family left their homeland in the midst of a 30-years-plus war with neighboring Yemen and Ethiopia, a few years before Eritrea’s independence in 1993 from Ethiopia.
After working for a local health company, Melekin got involved in community action by participating in a local protest march against the Trayvon Martin killing a couple of years ago. Soon thereafter, she joined Neighborhood Organizing for Change (NOC) after a local protest march against the state Voter ID proposal.

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Heart and soul of Hallie Q. Brown Center retires after 39 years

Mildred Brunson, the youngest of three children, a community legend, and a community mother who loves and is loved by her community has retired after 39 years of service from the Hallie Q. Brown Community Center. Although she does not like to talk about herself, she will speak openly about her love of the children, their parents and our community when she is honored on August 27 at the Center for her life’s work of community service and youth education.

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Was Charleston’s church massacre too noisy?

The June 17 Charleston massacre where nine persons were killed inside a church has “rekindled the debate” for stricter gun laws, says the latest Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) policy brief. But Minnesotans soon will be able to buy gun “silencers” after Gov. Mark Dayton on May 22 signed an omnibus public safety finance and policy bill that overwhelmingly passed both in the Senate and in the House during this year’s state legislative session.

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Jones-DeWeever: Confederate flag removal — overdue and not enough

The removal of the Confederate flag at the South Carolina capitol grounds has been hotly debated since the June 17 massacre of nine people at the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina.

But it’s not just South Carolina, five other Southern states have the Confederate symbol as part of its state flag: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi.

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Feds promote trust-building between communities of color, cops and courts

Skepticism was in no short supply June 16 at the American Indian Center in Minneapolis. The occasion was a community meeting called to introduce the U.S. Department of Justice’s new National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, an effort described as “designed to strengthen relationships between minority communities and the criminal justice system.”

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Support grows for taking down Confederate flag

In what is quickly and unexpectedly gaining ground as a fitting memorial to the nine African Americans killed by a White supremacist at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, S.C., some of the most ardent defendants of the confederate flag are reversing course and saying for the first time that the flag should no longer fly over the Capitol in South Carolina.

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U.S. African American cyclists to converge in Twin Cities

The National Brotherhood of Cyclists’ (NBC) Equity in Motion event (July 15 -19), which is not for brothers only. Sisters, too, are invited to get their two-wheel thing on.
The founders of Black Girls Do Bike Twin Cities — Pamela Moore, Tammy McLemore and Darcia Durham — will be on hand, having a pedaling good time along with lots of other similarly inclined ladies.

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Twin Cities clergy call for healing after Charleston church killings

“We’ve come to understand that terrorism is something that happens from people who have a large agenda beyond a small setting. A hate crime is specific, intentional and can be wicked,” said Rev. Stacey Smith, St. James’ pastor.
“I don’t know if there is a difference” between a hate crime and a terrorist act, admitted Zion Baptist Church Pastor Rev. Brian Herron. “If you commit a terrorist act, you commit it because of hate. I certainly know that this is terrorism and it’s hate. I think they are one and the same.”

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New Mpls NAACP officers ‘gearing up and ready to go’

VP Jones sees convergence of social justice and labor movements

Being a community advocate is high among Cathy Jones’ passions.
Jones, the Minneapolis NAACP second vice-president, recently spoke to the MSR by phone, saying she is encouraged by numerous community folk, including longtime members, who have expressed their support.

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